Career Diplomat Resigns because of 'fervent pursuit of war'

  1. Here is a paragraph of the letter of resignation to Colin Powell:
    Mr. Secretary, I have enormous respect for your character and ability. You have preserved more international credibility for us than our policy deserves, and salvaged something positive from the excesses of an ideological and self-serving Administration. But your loyalty to the President goes too far. We are straining beyond its limits an international system we built with such toil and treasure, a web of laws, treaties, organizations, and shared values that sets limits on our foes far more effectively than it ever constrained America's ability to defend its interests.
    complete text:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/27/in...l?pagewanted=2

    Keislling has been a diplomat for twenty years, serving in the Middle East, Armenia and Greece.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Dplear
    I would expect...no more like demand that Powels loyalty to President Bush be great. he works for him after all. If Keislling is not that loyal to the office of the President he needs to resign his post.

    Dave
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by Dplear
    I would expect...no more like demand that Powels loyalty to President Bush be great. he works for him after all. If Keislling is not that loyal to the office of the President he needs to resign his post.

    Dave
    You are probably right.
    My manager knows I will resign if asked to do (or not do) what is in the best interest of our patients.

    We have no freedom of speach at work. I will still speak up on behalf of my patient and have. Nursing management has supported me against a doctor in this. He did not want to be called at night to save the patients life.
  5. by   Dplear
    comparing pt care to politics is like apples and oranges. A diplomat puts forward the foriegn policy of the President. Nursing focus is different. two seperate creatures with thier own rules and ideals.

    Dave
  6. by   molecule
    Mr. Keisling is a career State Department official who has served under 4 presidents. His first loyalty is to the US, he is quitting because he cannot support the current administration's policy.

    http://www.cnn.com/2003/ALLPOLITICS/...ion/index.html
    Thursday, February 27, 2003 Posted: 6:36 PM EST (2336 GMT)
    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The State Department expressed regret Thursday over the decision of a veteran career diplomat to resign because of President Bush's "fervent pursuit of war with Iraq."

    J. Brady Kiesling, political officer at the U.S. embassy in Athens, said in a letter to Secretary of State Colin Powell that Bush's policies are "driving us to squander the international legitimacy that has been America's most potent weapon" for the past century.

    The letter was quoted by The New York Times. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher confirmed that Powell had received a letter from Kiesling.

    "This is a place where people have all kinds of ways of expressing their views," Boucher said. "It's too bad the gentleman didn't feel he could continue in the Foreign Service, given his views. But these things happen."

    A State Department official, speaking privately, said the views among department officials about Iraq tend to mirror the same divisions present in American society as a whole.

    Kiesling has been a diplomat for about 20 years and had postings in the Middle East, Armenia and Greece.

    In 1994, Kiesling received the William R. Rivkin Award "for constructive dissent" from the American Foreign Service Association, the professional organization of the U.S. Foreign Service.

    The award recognizes midlevel officers "who have demonstrated the courage to challenge the system from within, no matter the issue or the consequences of their actions." <<<
  7. by   Q.
    I didn't know where else to place this, but seeing as it's about the war, was wondering if any Ohio nurses could help.

    I heard of a letter written to the Plain Dealer in which a man by the name of Jim Fry wrote of his experiences as an anti-war protestor back in the 90's, and even went to Iraq to smoke a symbolic peace pipe among Iraqi citizens (the man is Sioux Indian by heritage).

    He wrote of how after examing history, he has determined that everyone wants peace, but there are different ways to go about it. He maintains that there's an element of preventing war by simply threatening force, because your opponent will back down. It was a very compelling letter, but I can't find it anywhere. Has anyone read this or seen it? I'd like to print it here for everyone else to read.
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by Dplear
    comparing pt care to politics is like apples and oranges. A diplomat puts forward the foriegn policy of the President. Nursing focus is different. two seperate creatures with thier own rules and ideals.

    Dave
    You are right.
    I only meant that I cannot speak against my facility if I want to keep my job. I may some day be forced to quit because of my ideals.
    The nurse on 60 Minutes who told the priest to leave thus avoiding unneeded heart surgery had to choose a difficult choice. It is even harder to dispute unsafe staffing.
    Working from within as this diplomat did is also an option for healthcare workers. So is using the power of a union to legally work for improvements.

    My husband agrees with you.
    I think you must not accept a job that does not fit your ethics. I would NOT work where I had to assist in a abortion. That is my choice.
    If my facility cannot provide safe care I must work for change or leave. This 20 year diplomat chose to leave.
    Some of us have morals we cannot comprimise for any job!
    PS: Does the President put forth the policy of most American people? I wish I knew. Lord knows polls are not reliable.
    Sorry if this is disjointed. I worked last night an am still in a fog.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Feb 28, '03

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