Can You Trust Your Heart?

  1. In reading responses to a member's personal dilemma, alot mentioned following your heart. One said "just follow your heart, it rarely leads you down the wrong path". I wondered . . . . in my own experience, when I've let my heart lead me I've made mistakes. I let my heart lead me into a marriage with a drug abuser because I loved him. If I had let my head lead me, I would have run the other way. So, as I was thinking about this, I logged onto a favorite site and found the following article - weird, huh? Anyway, I thought I'd post it here to see what y'all think about the general thought that your heart will not lead you down the wrong path.

    It's the heart versus the Bible
    Dennis Prager (archive)


    March 16, 2004 | Print | Send


    I recently interviewed a 26-year-old Swedish student about her views on life. I asked her if she believed in God or in any religion.

    "No, that's silly," she replied.

    "Then how do you know what is right and wrong?" I asked.

    "My heart tells me," she responded.

    In a nutshell, that's the major reason for the great divide within America and between America and much of Europe. The majority of people use their heart -- stirred by their eyes -- to determine what is right and wrong. A minority uses their mind and/or the Bible to make that determination.

    Pick almost any issue and these opposing ways of determining right and wrong become apparent.

    Here are three examples.

    Same-sex marriage: The heart favors it. You have to have a hard heart not to be moved when you see many of the loving same-sex couples who want to commit their lives to one another in marriage. The eye sees the couples; the heart is moved to redefine marriage.

    Animal rights: The heart favors them. It is the rare person, for example, whose heart is not moved by the sight of an animal used for medical research. The eye sees the cuddly animal; the heart then equates animal and human life.

    Abortion: How can you look at a sad 18-year-old who had unprotected sex and not be moved? What kind of heartless person is going to tell her she shouldn't have an abortion and should give birth?

    The eyes and the heart form an extraordinarily powerful force. They can only be overcome when formulating policies by a mind and a value system that are stronger than the heart-eye duo.

    With the decline of Judeo-Christian religions, the heart, shaped by what the eye sees (hence the power of television), has become the source of people's moral decisions.

    This is a potentially fatal problem for our civilization. As beautiful as the heart might be, it is neither intellectually nor morally profound.

    It is therefore frightening that hundreds of millions of people find no problem in acknowledging that their heart is the source of their values. Their heart knows better than thousands of years of accumulated wisdom; better than religions shaped by most of the finest thinkers of our civilization (and, to the believer, by God); and better than the book that has guided our society -- from the Founders of our uniquely successful society to the foes of slavery to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and most of the leaders of the struggle for racial equality.

    This elevation of one's heart is well beyond self-confidence -- it is self-deification.

    One of the first things you learn in Judaism and Christianity is that the eyes and heart are usually terrible guides to the good and the holy. " . . . (D)o not follow after your own heart and your own eyes, which you are inclined to whore after" (Numbers 15:39); "the heart is deceitful above all things . . . " (Jeremiah 17:9).

    Supporters of same-sex marriage see the loving gay couple, and therefore do not interest themselves in the effects of changing marriage and family on the children they do not see. And since they venerate their hearts, the biblical ideal of male-female love, marriage and family is of no significance to them.

    Animal rights supporters' hearts are deeply moved by the animals they see experimented on, not by the millions of people they do not see who will suffer and die if we stop such experiments.
    Likewise, the hearts of the people who support PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) are so moved by the plight of slaughtered chickens that the organization has a campaign titled "Holocaust on your plate," which equates our slaughtering of chickens with the Nazi slaughtering of Jews.

    For 25 years I have been asking high school seniors across America if they would save their dog or a stranger first if both were drowning. The majority has nearly always voted against the person. Why? Because, they say with no self-doubt, they love their dog, not the stranger. An entire generation has been raised with no reference to any moral code above their heart's feelings. They do not know, and would not care if they did know, that the Bible teaches that human beings, not animals, are created in God's image.

    So, too, those who cannot call any abortion immoral are moved by what they see -- the forlorn woman who wants an abortion, not by the human fetus they do not see. That is why abortion rights groups are so opposed to showing photos of fetuses that have been aborted -- such pictures might move the eye and the heart of viewers to judge the morality of many abortions differently.

    It is undeniable that many people have used their minds and many have used the Bible in ways that have led to evil. And some of these people have been truly heartless. But not one of the great cruelties of the 20th century -- the Gulag, Auschwitz, Cambodia, North Korea, Mao's Cultural Revolution -- came from those who took their values from the Bible. And the great evil of the 21st century, though religion-based, doesn't come from the Bible either.

    Meanwhile, the combination of mind, Judeo-Christian values and heart has produced over centuries the unique success known as America. Reliance on the heart will destroy this painstaking achievement in a generation.

    http://www.townhall.com/columnists/d...20040316.shtml
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  2. 26 Comments

  3. by   jkaee
    Thank you, thank you, stevielynn, for having the courage to post that article. What it states is SO true, and dealt with issues I personally have had a moral struggle with, but this put it all in perspective. I will print this article and have my family read it.

    I, too, was in a situation about 12 years ago when I wanted to follow my heart rather than my head, but luckily, my head won out, and my life and the life of another is so much better because of it.

    Jennifer
  4. by   Tweety
    O.K. I'll bite. Very very interesting. When I was a churchgoer I used the Bible as my guideline, following the example of Jesus who selflessly gave so much love. But not as a literal interpretation on how to life my live 2000 years after it was written. I also am studying the Bhudda, and find many examples on how to live in those teachings as well.

    Others take it literally: "The Bible says it, I believe it, end of discussion". My only problem with that is the translators prejudices come into play.

    Sometimes like you Steph my heart has lead me to many harsh and painful lessons that would have been better served had I used my head. To live is to risk. I know when I listen to that still inner voice, usually I'm o.k.

    I do know to the very depths of my heart that my love for my same sex spouse is real, blessed and not condemned. No one, no how, no how many quotes you throw at me is going to convince me otherwise.
    Last edit by Tweety on Mar 16, '04 : Reason: typos of course.
  5. by   Rustyhammer
    Not being familiar with the bible I guess I have to listen to...me.
    -Russell
  6. by   LeesieBug
    Thanks for posting the article. It made me think, and raised some good points.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Just a little annoying question that niggles me:

    which of the some 26 versions of the Bible (the Aramaic translation awaits, yet) do you suppose all these tenets and beliefs that we hold-self evident, and as a basis for using our heads---- (versus our hearts)---- come from? I am just wondering. Even among Christians we cannot agree on the Bible's true translation and exactly what relevance to daily life it truly holds. This does not even address non-believers and what they may make of this. Just my thoughts.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Mar 16, '04
  8. by   Jaaaman
    Quote from stevielynn

    It's the heart versus the Bible
    Dennis Prager (archive)


    March 16, 2004 | Print | Send




    Supporters of same-sex marriage see the loving gay couple, and therefore do not interest themselves in the effects of changing marriage and family on the children they do not see. And since they venerate their hearts, the biblical ideal of male-female love, marriage and family is of no significance to them.


    It is undeniable that many people have used their minds and many have used the Bible in ways that have led to evil. And some of these people have been truly heartless. But not one of the great cruelties of the 20th century -- the Gulag, Auschwitz, Cambodia, North Korea, Mao's Cultural Revolution -- came from those who took their values from the Bible. And the great evil of the 21st century, though religion-based, doesn't come from the Bible either.

    Meanwhile, the combination of mind, Judeo-Christian values and heart has produced over centuries the unique success known as America. Reliance on the heart will destroy this painstaking achievement in a generation.

    http://www.townhall.com/columnists/d...20040316.shtml
    Amen to that!
  9. by   Jaaaman
    Thank you for the article!
  10. by   lucianne
    Just because the places your heart leads you into are sometimes painful and seem like mistakes does not mean those were places you weren't supposed to go. If you didn't make mistakes, would you learn and grow as much? If you hadn't felt pain or been in bad situations, could you have as much empathy for your patients?

    I think our heart can tell us what is right or wrong, but whether or not we listen to what it is really telling us is another issue altogether.

    One part of the Bible that I agree with wholeheartedly is "love thy neighbor as thyself." To me that means loving all people regardless of gender, race, sexual preference, socioeconomic status, political affiliation (although this one is hard for me!), mistakes they've made, mistakes they continue to make. It means I want my neighbor to be able to have what I have--food, shelter, safety, a family, health care, education...

    luci
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Hiya . . . just some FYI . . I didn't post this to make comments on gay marriage or the bible exactly even though that is how the author of the article took it. I was just wondering if the adage "follow your heart and it will never lead you wrong" is true.

    My question is simply should you trust your heart? Or does logic (your mind) need to come into the picture?

    Tweety, I'm absolutely sure that you are blessed by having your spouse in your life and was NOT commenting on that.

    I'm not sure it is good advice to just tell someone to trust their heart. Taking a look at the consequences of behavior and choices surely needs to come into the equation. Just living your life willy nilly without thought to how it will effect you and others seems selfish.

    I dunno . . .this subject seemed interesting to me.

    Thanks for responding . . .

    steph
  12. by   fergus51
    My heart has definitely led me down some strange paths.... but I don't regret a single one of them. I just wouldn't be me if I hadn't done those things. I think I do what I was meant to do, don't you? I mean, would you have met your loving husband or had the kids you do if your heart hadn't led you to your first husband, pain and all? I think you have to listen to the points made by your head and your heart and then do what you think is best.
  13. by   MryRose
    Quote from lucianne
    Just because the places your heart leads you into are sometimes painful and seem like mistakes does not mean those were places you weren't supposed to go. If you didn't make mistakes, would you learn and grow as much? If you hadn't felt pain or been in bad situations, could you have as much empathy for your patients?

    I think our heart can tell us what is right or wrong, but whether or not we listen to what it is really telling us is another issue altogether.

    One part of the Bible that I agree with wholeheartedly is "love thy neighbor as thyself." To me that means loving all people regardless of gender, race, sexual preference, socioeconomic status, political affiliation (although this one is hard for me!), mistakes they've made, mistakes they continue to make. It means I want my neighbor to be able to have what I have--food, shelter, safety, a family, health care, education...

    luci
    I agree with you Luci.

    I believe that there is a reason for EVERYTHING that we go thru if we are brave enough to seek it out.

    We are always the "student" in life and always the "teacher". We learn through our expiences, joyful, sad, trying, pleasant etc.

    We have the wonderful opportunity to help others with the insights we have gained.

    Sharing your experiences, both good and bad, is the most loving and awesome gift one can give. I have had some really rough times, but I have learned so very much. I would not trade my life lessons for anything. They make me who I am today, and I feel pretty comfortable with myself.

    I look forward to every day because I know I will have opportunities. I will make mistakes, I will havae bad days, I will have rough times, I will see joy and pain and everthing in between. For that I am grateful.

    I am my Brothers Keeper, as he is mine. Love thy Neighbor applys to ALL people.... Gay and Straight alike. You are welcome at my home anytime.

    Peace and Hugs!

    MaryRose
  14. by   rollingstone
    Interesting thread. It reminds me of the Rush album (cd) Hemispheres where the epic battle of heart vs. mind is cleverly expressed in some darn good music.

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