Calling all Grandmothers! Tell me what you think?

  1. My daughter just told me that my 10 mo old grandson will be getting a flu shot. I realize that the flu shot should be given to at risk babies but healthy robust infants? When do their own bodies get to build immunity to anything if we keep vaccinating everything? I understand MMR, polio, etc....we can't allow them to become global epedemics.

    Do any other grandmothers feel the same way or is it just me who thinks the flu vaccine for a 10 mo old infant is over doing it?
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    My daughter just told me that my 10 mo old grandson will be getting a flu shot. I realize that the flu shot should be given to at risk babies but healthy robust infants? When do their own bodies get to build immunity to anything if we keep vaccinating everything? I understand MMR, polio, etc....we can't allow them to become global epedemics.

    Do any other grandmothers feel the same way or is it just me who thinks the flu vaccine for a 10 mo old infant is over doing it?
    It is standard to give flu shots to kids/infants in my area.

    However, I tend to side with you and didn't get a flu shot for my son. I didn't get the chicken pox immunization either.

    All three of my older kids had the chicken pox, all at the same time. It just seems weird to me to give a kid a shot for chicken pox.

    He is five now - and I'm looking for a chicken pox party!

    steph
  4. by   Spidey's mom
    p.s.

    I'm not a grandmother but I'm old enough to be one.

    steph
  5. by   babynurselsa
    It is now pretty standard. Flu and pnuemonia I believe. This is on top of all the others that have been added over the last few years.
  6. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from stevielynn
    p.s.

    I'm not a grandmother but I'm old enough to be one.

    steph
    I know steph, you're my hero, still raising small children. My hats off to you!

    My kids didn't get the chicken pox vaccine either. I purposely exposed them several times when their friends had them....no luck. Then one day they both came down with a case of the chicken pox but I wasn't too happy because it was the day before we were to go to Hawaii for a week.:uhoh21:
    But we did get to go a month later and had a great time.
    Last edit by DutchgirlRN on Sep 6, '06
  7. by   Tweety
    Here's what the CDC says about who should be getting flu shots:

    Who Should Get Vaccinated?
    In general, anyone who wants to reduce their chances of getting the flu can get vaccinated. However, certain people should get vaccinated each year. They are either people who are at high risk of having serious flu complications or people who live with or care for those at high risk for serious complications. People who should get vaccinated each year are:

    People who should get vaccinated each year are:http://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm

    1.) People at high risk for complications from the flu:

    People 65 years and older;
    People who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities that house those with long-term illnesses;
    Adults and children 6 months and older with chronic heart or lung conditions, including asthma;
    Adults and children 6 months and older who needed regular medical care or were in a hospital during the previous year because of a metabolic disease (like diabetes), chronic kidney disease, or weakened immune system (including immune system problems caused by medicines or by infection with human immunodeficiency virus [HIV/AIDS]);
    Children 6 months to 18 years of age who are on long-term aspirin therapy. (Children given aspirin while they have influenza are at risk of Reye syndrome.);
    Women who will be pregnant during the influenza season;
    All children 6 to 23 months of age;
    People with any condition that can compromise respiratory function or the handling of respiratory secretions (that is, a condition that makes it hard to breathe or swallow, such as brain injury or disease, spinal cord injuries, seizure disorders, or other nerve or muscle disorders.)
  8. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from Tweety
    1.) People at high risk for complications from the flu:

    People 65 years and older;
    People who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities that house those with long-term illnesses;
    Adults and children 6 months and older with chronic heart or lung conditions, including asthma;
    Adults and children 6 months and older who needed regular medical care or were in a hospital during the previous year because of a metabolic disease (like diabetes), chronic kidney disease, or weakened immune system (including immune system problems caused by medicines or by infection with human immunodeficiency virus [HIV/AIDS]);
    Children 6 months to 18 years of age who are on long-term aspirin therapy. (Children given aspirin while they have influenza are at risk of Reye syndrome.);
    Women who will be pregnant during the influenza season;
    All children 6 to 23 months of age;
    People with any condition that can compromise respiratory function or the handling of respiratory secretions (that is, a condition that makes it hard to breathe or swallow, such as brain injury or disease, spinal cord injuries, seizure disorders, or other nerve or muscle disorders.)
    That just makes my point. I understand all of the above, and definately agree, except: All children 6 to 23 months of age.
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    Well, I know I'm going to push the issue for my grandson, because he was diagnosed with asthma today. Poor kid........I'd really hoped he wouldn't get it, he's never even had a cold until this past week, but that's what triggered it. I suppose he never had a chance---both parents, one set of grandparents (us), and two of his uncles are asthmatics! I'm just glad both Mom and Dad know what it sounds like; Amanda said he woke up wheezing this morning, and that was it, off to the doctor they went. So now he's on Prelone (yeeecccccccchhhhhhh, that's what they used to give my sons, which they promptly threw up) and albuterol blow-by nebs........you BET he's gonna get that flu shot!!

    As for healthy children, I just don't see how it can be a bad idea to have them vaccinated against the flu..........Lord knows little ones get sick often enough, and flu can be devastating to the very young as well as the very old. I should think it would be worth doing, but that's JMHO.
  10. by   DutchgirlRN
    Marla, I'm so sorry your Grandbaby has asthma. That must be difficult for everyone especially for that baby. I would make sure he gets the flu shot also.

    Thankfully my grandbaby doesn't have health issues, as of yet, so I'll be encouraging his immune system to build up. My kids got really sick as babies with resp infections, temps of 104-105,..they have very rarely been sick since babyhood. My 25 y/o has had strep x 1 and mono and my 17 y/o
    has had a bad case of swimmers ear and one sinus infection so very few antibiotics for them ever. I may be deluding myself but I feel like I played a part in them having good immune systems. When other kids were all bundled up my kids were out playing with just a light jacket on and they took naps outside in 50-70 degree weather.

    Partly it's how I was raised, european, fresh air and sunshine. Not that I agree with no vaccinations but I never had any and neither did my brothers because in Holland they didn't do that 50 years ago. We never had mumps, measles, rubella or chickenpox. I was vaccinated for all by the time I went to junior high, and chicken pox as an adult, because it was mandatory for me to attend school. I did get vaccinated for polio in Holland as a baby.
    Last edit by DutchgirlRN on Sep 7, '06
  11. by   Roy Fokker
    I wonder of this was an issue in the aftermath of WWI (assuming flu vaccines were available then, ofcourse).

    Far as I can tell stuff like chicken pox is rarely fatal.
    Flu can be.


    Just an ameteur historian's thoughts.


    cheers,
  12. by   live4today
    Marla - I share your concerns, but this is a NASTIER world we live in today. There are GERMS born OF GERMS. Whether we vaccinate or not, every human being (regardless of age or health status) is subject to side effects from the consequences. Several of my grandchildren have asthma, and they receive flu shots each year. I have received the flu shots the past few years, and still manage to get sick (head or chest cold...bronchitis, etc.) each Winter.
  13. by   Grace Oz
    I'm a bit on the side of fresh air and sunshine myself.
    While fully understanding and appreciating the need in many instances for immunisation, I feel if we never allow the body to develop it's own rescources against infection, that goes against what nature intended. I think we should err on the side of caution and perhaps try and have a healthy combination. Where possible, of course.
    I 'sort of' liken it to people losing basic skills due to the fact there's technology, tools, etc available. Does that make any sense? Know what I'm trying to say, just not quite articulating it very well!
    I'm not a grandmother, but hope to be ..... one day! :-)
  14. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    My daughter just told me that my 10 mo old grandson will be getting a flu shot. I realize that the flu shot should be given to at risk babies but healthy robust infants? When do their own bodies get to build immunity to anything if we keep vaccinating everything? I understand MMR, polio, etc....we can't allow them to become global epedemics.

    Do any other grandmothers feel the same way or is it just me who thinks the flu vaccine for a 10 mo old infant is over doing it?
    I really just don't like the flu shots in general unless for high risk groups. <shrug> Just a personal thing.

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