Bush vacations in Crawford,Texas August 2001

  1. the past several days we have been waiting for the Presidential Briefing of August 6,2001 to be declassified and released. while waiting I looked back to see what President Bush was doing; here is a tidbit from TeamGOPnews:

    Bush Golfs, Doesn't Miss Washington
    8/7/2001 5:16 PM
    President Bush rolled out of his ranch at dawn Tuesday for golf and talk, saying he is thoroughly at home amid the outdoor play and work of his Texas vacation. "I'm the kind of person who likes to be outdoors; it keeps my mind and my spirits up and it keeps me a balanced person," Bush told reporters moments before he teed off at Ridgewood Golf Club on a hill overlooking Lake Waco. "I know a lot of you wish you were on the East Coast, lying on the beach, sucking in the salt air," the president said. "But I love this place," he said of his 1,600-acre ranch up the road near the tiny town of Crawford.

    this was the day after the
    "Osama Bin Laden Determined to Attack Inside the US" briefing had been given Bush.

    this was back when people were wondering if Bush worked hard enough and some wondered if he were in charge. there was criticism of his taking a 30 day vacation just months into his job. so his counselor insisted:
    "Hughes rattles off a list of things that will take up the president's time, from daily national security briefings to whatever national and international matters may come up."
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/washing...h-vacation.htm
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   NurseHardee
    Yeah, nobody was told that the US had had a declaration of war made, by an army that the US government had created to use against the Soviet Union. NH
    ```````````````````````````````
    Hearing Focuses Harsh Light on FBI
    By Josh Meyer Times Staff Writer

    WASHINGTON-Despite a sudden burst of intelligence in the summer of 2001 pointing to an imminent Al Qaeda attack, including indications of a major event within the United States, the FBI (news - web sites) never passed that threat information to its thousands of field agents across the country.

    Not even those agents involved in the FBI's 70 ongoing domestic terrorism investigations were told to "shake the trees" in an effort to dislodge information pointing to such an attack, despite bureau concerns about a pattern of "suspicious activity" that suggested terrorists might be planning a domestic hijacking.

    The problem appears to go beyond the widely criticized failure of the FBI, the CIA and other agencies to share information and cooperate with one another. In this case, the intelligence warnings apparently reached FBI headquarters but were not passed along to field agents who might have been able to develop more information.

    The FBI's failure to alert its agents to the spike in ominous intelligence came to light during Thursday's hearing of the congressionally mandated independent commission investigating the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in New York and at the Pentagon (news - web sites).


    National security advisor Condoleezza Rice (news - web sites), in testimony before the commission, said the failure to detect the Sept. 11 plot was in large part a result of "structural" weaknesses in the intelligence community, particularly legal and other barriers that prevented the FBI, the CIA and other agencies from sharing information fully.


    She acknowledged the existence of such problems inside the FBI too, but asserted that the bureau had done all it could to alert its agents to an impending attack.


    That assertion was bluntly challenged by commission member Timothy J. Roemer, a former Democratic congressman from Indiana.


    "We have done thousands of interviews here at the 9/11 commission. We have gone through literally millions of pieces of paper," Roemer said. "To date, we have found nobody-nobody at the FBI-who knows anything about a tasking of field offices."Nothing went down the chain to the FBI field offices on spiking of information, on knowledge of Al Qaeda in the country," he said.


    FBI officials said Thursday and again Friday that they would issue no immediate response to the commissioner's remarks.


    But the disclosures by the 9/11 commission suggested that the FBI's failures before the terrorist attacks were worse-and more systemic-than previously acknowledged, despite a steady stream of already embarrassing revelations over the last 2 1/2 years.


    The new revelations also underscored how little the American public really knew about the FBI's central role in behind-the-scenes U.S. efforts to uncover and disrupt what was expected to be a "spectacular" Al Qaeda attack in the months before Sept. 11.


    What the bureau did or did not do is likely to become much clearer next week.

    On Tuesday and Wednesday, the commission will place under oath current and former leaders of the FBI and its oversight agency, the Department of Justice (news - web sites).


    Several of the 9/11 commissioners said in interviews that more embarrassing disclosures about the FBI would come out in the hearings, and that they planned to interrogate current FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III, Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft (news - web sites) and his predecessor, Janet Reno (news - web sites), about their counterterrorism plans and policies.


    Those commissioners said they planned to save their most scorching criticism for Louis Freeh, who retired in June 2001 after eight years as President Clinton (news - web sites)'s FBI director and five months under Bush.


    Several panelists said their investigation had shown that Freeh's near-total disregard for intelligence-gathering efforts and information sharing spread through the FBI culture, so much so that even the most alarming threats about Al Qaeda activities were not shared with other counterterrorism agencies or with FBI headquarters, other field offices and even within individual offices.


    Freeh has consistently refused to comment on the issue.

    "Clearly, what we had right up through 9/11 did not function properly. It did not do the job that was expected of it," said commissioner John F. Lehman, secretary of the Navy under President Reagan.

    In interviews, Lehman-like commission Chairman Thomas H. Kean and at least one other commissioner-emphasized bureau-wide FBI shortcomings in concluding that they believed the terrorist attacks could have been prevented.

    "We're not talking about specific decisions that one person did or didn't do, or if they felt it was urgent or not urgent," Lehman said. "It is because the domestic security system Before 9/11 was not adequate in so many ways."

    Congressional investigators, for instance, revealed that the CIA waited 18 months, until Aug. 21, 2001, before asking domestic law enforcement agencies to place two suspected Al Qaeda operatives on a "watch list" that would deny them entry into the U.S. By then, both operatives were in the country and would later become two of the 19 hijackers on Sept. 11.

    Lehman was also critical of the FBI for failing to gather and analyze domestic intelligence that could have pointed to an Al Qaeda attack.

    He stopped short of saying the commission would ultimately single out the FBI for a majority of its criticism when it releases its report July 26. And he declined to say whether the commission would call on the Bush administration to wrest domestic intelligence gathering from the FBI-against its wishes-and give it to the Department of Homeland Security or some new independent agency.

    "You're getting ahead of us," Lehman said. "That's what we're going to talk about next week."

    During their public session Thursday, the commission's 10 congressionally appointed members criticized a wide array of government agencies for failing to adequately respond to the escalating Al Qaeda threat, both domestically and overseas.

    Lehman ticked off a long list of new disclosures about governmental lapses before Sept. 11:

    * The U.S. Marshals Service had stopped assigning sky marshals to domestic flights. The Federal Aviation Administration (news - web sites) had for 10 straight years reported-to little effect-that inspection teams testing security systems at U.S. airports were able to penetrate them 80% of the time.

    * The Immigration and Naturalization Service cut in half its internal security enforcement budget. And the U.S. government had officially decided-"for political reasons" to allow local police departments to refuse to share information and otherwise cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

    * U.S. officials stood by as the Saudi Arabian government spread the seeds of terror by funding schools and mosques in the United States and overseas that spread a violent, anti-U.S. variation of Islam.

    * The Saudi government repeatedly refused to give U.S. officials direct access to terrorists in its custody, including the chief financial officer of Al Qaeda and the perpetrators of the 1996 bombing of the Khobar Towers military housing complex in the city of Dhahran that killed 19 Americans.

    A senior Saudi official, Adel Al-Jubeir, disputed Lehman's account.

    Rice, for her part, said she had been unaware of most of the other problems Lehman cited until after the Sept. 11 attacks.

    But throughout the summer of 2001, Rice said, the White House made the FBI well aware of the huge volume of threat information, most of it indicating an attack overseas.

    Threats Intensify

    As the summer wore on, the threats intensified. On Aug. 6, President Bush (news - web sites) was presented with a classified CIA briefing report ominously titled, "Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S." All the while, Rice told the commissioners, she was given to understand that the FBI was fully mobilized.

    "The FBI tasked all 56 of its U.S. field offices to increase surveillance of known suspected terrorists and to reach out to known informants who might have information on terrorist activities," she said.

    Rice also said the bureau issued at least three nationwide warnings to federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, including FBI field offices.

    In the past, much attention has focused on the FBI's problems in communicating with the CIA and other agencies. But the new disclosures, and next week's hearings, point toward problems of internal communication.

    Roemer said that as part of its investigation, the commission had already interviewed one of next week's witnesses, Thomas J. Pickard, a veteran FBI official who took over as acting director after Freeh retired and until Mueller took over one week before the Sept. 11 attacks

    Pickard, Roemer disclosed during the hearing, told the commission he never instructed the field offices to report back with information about suspicious activity.

    "And we have talked to the special agents in charge. They don't have any recollection of receiving a notice of threat," Roemer said.

    In addition to Roemer, Rice's assertions were challenged by Jamie S. Gorelick, a commission member and former deputy attorney general in the Clinton administration.

    "You indicate in your statement that the FBI tasked its field offices to find out what was going on out there. We have no record of that," Gorelick told Rice. "The Washington field office international terrorism people say they never heard about the threat, they never heard about the warnings ... special agents in charge around the country, Miami in particular, no knowledge of this."

    If such efforts had been made, Gorelick said, the FBI might have gleaned valuable information from FBI people on the front lines, such as FBI lawyer Colleen Rowley in Minnesota, who was suspicious of a French-Algerian man named Zacarias Moussaoui, who was detained as he attended flight school without being able to identify who was paying his tuition.

    Moussaoui has since been charged as a co-conspirator in the Sept. 11 plot.

    Concerns about Moussaoui were never passed along to senior FBI officials in Washington, who also never received a memo by an FBI counterterrorism agent in Phoenix that summer warning of suspicious Arab men taking flight lessons. His request for a bureau-wide investigation into such activity was rejected by FBI headquarters.

    "And I personally believe, having heard Colleen Rowley's testimony about her frustrations in the Moussaoui incident, that if someone had really gone out to the agents who were working these issues on the ground and said, 'We are at battle stations. We need to know what's happening out there. Come to us,' she would have broken through barriers to have that happen, because she was knocking on doors and they weren't opening," Gorelick said.

    FBI officials, while declining to comment publicly, forcefully objected to the remarks by the two commissioners. In interviews, several of them said that FBI officials from the director's office on down were fully mobilized in the hunt for Al Qaeda operatives.

    One FBI official said the bureau had for months braced for the hearings focusing on the FBI. "Around here," the official said of FBI headquarters, "We've been calling it finger-pointing week."
  4. by   teeituptom
    Will Iraq be Bushies Viet Nam
  5. by   maureeno
    Bush assures us had he been warned about a time and place of attack
    he would have not gone golfing...

    >>"There was not a time and place of an attack. It said Osama bin Laden had designs on America. Well, I knew that. What I wanted to know was, is there anything specifically going to take place in America that we needed to react to."<<<
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/...ion/index.html

    Bush must divide things so clearly
    on/off
    with us/against us
    he has no perception

    no ability to imagine
    no ability to prepare for events outside his tiny mental scope;
    scope limited by delusions of omnipotence

    I do not think BushII has the capacity to learn from mistakes
    because he cannot admit them
    he told us he was humble
    humbug!

    he is indeed "the worst president ever"
    a fraudulent leader gone wild
  6. by   Mkue
    maureeno, hindsight is 20/20.

    There are many things that could have been done prior to 9/11, prior to Aug memo and prior to 2000 even. Perhaps if we'd had something like the Patriot Act already in place, we might have been able to share more precise information. Al qaeda had been planning the attacks since before 2000.

    Profiling, searching, arming cockpits, many people are against some of the things that could have actually aided us in thwarting attacks.

    We had been attacked by Al qaeda before in the US so many of these things that we have in place now should or could have been in place for years. We didn't have a Homeland Security department before 9/11.

    I believe that a declaration of war was made by the first attack in 1993, we could have shaken up the FBI and CIA then and created a Homeland Security and shaken up the Immigration department well before we were attacked again in 2001.

    But like I said, hindsight is 20/20.
  7. by   donmurray
    So the briefing would have had to have read something like,

    "Osama Bin Laden Determined to attack inside the US - on 9/11 by hijacking 3 planes from airfields X,Y,Z and flying them into the Twin towers and the Pentagon armed only with boxcutters"

    before he would have paid attention?
  8. by   maureeno
    mkue, Bush and the nation would have been better served
    had Bush not so long resisted an investigation
    into FBI/CIA failures in his
    and Clinton's administrations.
    Earlier the American public could have been more sympathetic

    But BushII, to paraphrase the words of John McCain
    'footdragged and stonewalled' for two years.
    another gamble, another loss

    now the political price to pay will be very high
    tune in tomorrow's press conference...

    Bush stands naked now
    hooray for democracy
    hooray for accountablity
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    Yeah, but maureeno, Bush has got the luck of the devil himself.......NOTHING sticks to the man. Not the real motivations for the war in Iraq, not his anti-woman, anti-worker, anti-average American policies, not even the overtime bill or the "outing" of the CIA agent. And everybody thought Ronald Reagan was the Teflon President
  10. by   nekhismom
    The NEW Teflon.....BushII.

    Let's just hope, pray, and VOTE Bush II out in NOvember!
  11. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from teeituptom
    Will Iraq be Bushies Viet Nam

    Iraq already is Bush's Viet Nam. Even time Magazine's cover story this week is comparing Iraq to Viet Nam.
  12. by   teeituptom
    Quote from maureeno
    Bush assures us had he been warned about a time and place of attack
    he would have not gone golfing...

    >>"There was not a time and place of an attack. It said Osama bin Laden had designs on America. Well, I knew that. What I wanted to know was, is there anything specifically going to take place in America that we needed to react to."<<<
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/...ion/index.html

    Bush must divide things so clearly
    on/off
    with us/against us
    he has no perception

    no ability to imagine
    no ability to prepare for events outside his tiny mental scope;
    scope limited by delusions of omnipotence

    I do not think BushII has the capacity to learn from mistakes
    because he cannot admit them
    he told us he was humble
    humbug!

    he is indeed "the worst president ever"
    a fraudulent leader gone wild

    That messed up my tee time also
  13. by   ArleneG
    Quote from donmurray
    So the briefing would have had to have read something like,

    "Osama Bin Laden Determined to attack inside the US - on 9/11 by hijacking 3 planes from airfields X,Y,Z and flying them into the Twin towers and the Pentagon armed only with boxcutters"

    before he would have paid attention?
    George Bush at a Restaurant:
    George W Bush went hungry last night because he did not know he had to
    order from the menu. He sat at the table for 6 hours until the restaurant
    closed and he was asked to leave without getting his meal.


    "They gave me a menu but I thought it was "kind of a history" of what they
    served in the past - not what was available now or in the future. It did'nt
    provide me with a plan on a silver platter as to how to order a burrito, if
    a burrito was really available, when they were available or how they are
    served." The confused prez said. "There was no information as to how to
    proceed. I didn't think there was a need to ask questions because I thought
    the waitress would simply bring me the burrito when it was ready. It's the
    cook's fault. The whole ordering process needs to be redone."
  14. by   elkpark
    :roll :roll I love it! Thanks!

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