Birth Control for middle schoolers??

  1. PORTLAND, Maine - School officials on Thursday defended a decision to allow children as young as 11 to obtain birth-control pills at a middle-school health center, saying the new policy is aimed at a tiny number of sexually active students.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071018/...1RF6lwkfoE1vAI
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   Laught3r
    I don't know what I would do if my 11yo started having sex (ever ).
    I think too many parents have left sex education up to the schools for so long that schools feel justified in encroaching more and more on parental rights. Parents need to step up and turn off MTV and BET and talk to their children about the images they see. Talk to their children about sex and not just the physical act but the psychological aspect. Boys need to know that sex is not just for this moment in time. Girls need to know that sex is not the only way you can show love. I believe that even with all the sex on TV and in songs and at schools nothing beat parents instilling their virtues in their children.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from nursepanther
    I don't know what I would do if my 11yo started having sex (ever ).
    I think too many parents have left sex education up to the schools for so long that schools feel justified in encroaching more and more on parental rights. Parents need to step up and turn off MTV and BET and talk to their children about the images they see. Talk to their children about sex and not just the physical act but the psychological aspect. Boys need to know that sex is not just for this moment in time. Girls need to know that sex is not the only way you can show love. I believe that even with all the sex on TV and in songs and at schools nothing beat parents instilling their virtues in their children.
    If parents all did what they were supposed to do, this would be an ideal world. In the real world, we are seeing more and more irresponsible, uninvolved parents, and more kids running wild.

    The images in our media send the message that being attractive and sexually desired are the best things a girl can be.

    I think if our culture placed more value on a female's intelligence rather than her looks, girls would have a strong enough sense of self, that they would not be having so much sex.

    I, for one, am glad that schools are stepping up and stepping in where so many parents are failing.
  5. by   mamunsey
    I work in a middle school, and i know parents have been slacking at home, i would not be comfortable giving birth control to a 6th grader, the schools here have a family life class they take, starting in 3rd grade through 12th. i have educated my 8 year old, for her age, when she askes ? i answer her honestly. what people need to realize is that birth control may prevent "babies having babies" but it don't prevent the spread of HIV or any other skin to skin contact disease! i think i would have to protest if they wanted to do that at my school. high school level maybe, but not middle schools.
  6. by   SuesquatchRN
    Kids who want to have sex are going to have it, abstinence ed or not.

    Keep them infertile.
  7. by   agent66
    I simply cannot imagine. My ten year old is still thankfully playing with Barbie's, although she does find the 15year old across the street "cute". She did mention one day how she thought she would like to have a baby and we had the "talk", and she was told quite frankly what goes where and that the adorable little infant she thought she would like would be coming out of the same place. Ewwwwe with a scrunched up face was the response, so I think we are okay for awhile yet. I have been straight forward with both children from an early age as I did not want them being misinformed on the schoolyard re the facts of life. Informed children are hopefully smarter ones, but throwing condoms and bcps at them in middle school?? They start sex ed here in grade six, but as far as I know there is no distribution of birth control in the schoolprogram.
  8. by   rn/writer
    This is wrong on so many levels.

    One of the rationales for this is that a small percentage of parents do nothing to equip their children to deal with sexual issues and those kids have no where else to turn. Let me get this straight--because a small percentage of kids can't talk to their parents, let's penalize the families that are functioning well and do try to talk about important issues. Let's make birth control available to eleven year olds who for pity's sake are not even teens yet and who do dumb things just because they think like eleven year olds.

    Then, to further muck things up, let's keep everything secret, especially from the parents who, if they knew their child was interested in birth control, might stand a fighting chance at connecting with their kid and helping them to delay this grossly early onset "maturity." We can't have parents involved at all because that small minority might mess it up. The fact that most parents care deeply about their children is immaterial.

    While we're at it, why don't we reinforce the idea that children don't have to answer to anyone--except perhaps the state--certainly not to their parents who, while they are held accountable for their children's actions, are not even allowed to find out about some of them until it's too late.

    Laws like this make it clear that there are some who view parents mostly as drones to do the work of raising a child on behalf of the state to whom the child really belongs. Unless, of course, the kid messes up, and then authority reverts to the parents because someone has to take the fall, and you can bet it won't be the folks who deemed parents irrelevant and intrusive back when the young person needed guidance from someone who cared.

    I feel bad for kids who don't have concerned and involved parents, but that doesn't mean that you take from the other kids the support and involvement of parents who are trying to do a good job. At the very least, there ought to be an opt-out clause for parents who do NOT want their child to receive contraceptives at school or anywhere else while in junior high.

    I've said this before, but I think it bears repeating. I'd like to see sex education classes for PARENTS to learn what and how to teach their kids what they need to know. Many people stumble and fumble in this area because they don't feel equipped to do the job properly. So teach THEM how to teach their kids. Then it can be done in the context of a family with their values included. Such a program could be done in conjunction with the school offerings instead of the school side of things trying to render parental involvement moot.

    I know this is an old, tired cliche, but the truth of it really stings. Kids need parental permission to get their ears pierced, but they're on their own when it comes to the entire arena of reproductive activity. This crazy business of reducing sexual activity to a dangerous blend of hydraulics and personal rights is doing a terrible disservice and injustice to children and their families.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Oct 19, '07
  9. by   txspadequeenRN
    oh boy...what a issue.

    lord have mercy!!!!!

    geeezzzz louise!!!!

    truth is sex whether it be intercourse or oral happen all the time in middle school. what we need is parents to get down and dirty explaining sex and consequences to their children. forget all this "i don't know how to talk to my kids about that " or "don't they do that in school"....bs
    the biggest sexual deterrent that a kid can have is a parents involvement and explanation . and this clinic that is offering the bc is requiring parental consent but after that they tell nothing to the parents. because my children are minors they have no privacy and i own the rights to them....this mess don't fly with me.
  10. by   Jolie
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse

    I, for one, am glad that schools are stepping up and stepping in where so many parents are failing.
    I agree that many parents fail their children on this topic. But by simply handing out birth control to 11 year-olds, the school is not, in my opinion, stepping up and stepping in where parents are failing.

    If the school were truly interested in filling the void left by parents, they would offer sex-education classes and healthcare services that required participation of BOTH parent and child. To provide hormonal contraceptives to developing young girls without the involvement of parents and primary care providers, they are simply failing the children in a different way.
  11. by   Roy Fokker
    Let me preface my comment by saying: I'm no parent.

    Now, I remember when a misbehaving kid picked up by the police was turned over to his parents. Today, the kids are taken to jail. I think that teachers are unable to recognize the decline of their own authority in the decline of parental authority. "Schools" today do a lot more than just "teach" - and I don't think all of it is positive.


    Again, I'm no parent - but I don't want "the school" teaching my kid stuff I don't approve off. Would people be comfortable if schools preached "abstinence only"? I mean after all, sauce for the goose is good for the gander, right?


    cheers,
  12. by   NurseyBaby'05
    OMG, yes! Miranda, you hit the nail on the head for sure.
  13. by   Cursed Irishman
    Quote from Suesquatch
    Kids who want to have sex are going to have it, abstinence ed or not.

    Keep them infertile.
    And create chemical birth control for the boys as well.
  14. by   HM2VikingRN
    This is the best argument yet for comprehensive sex education programs .......

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