Biloxi/Gulf Port, MS

  1. We traveled home from Florida by way of Biloxi and Gulf Port, MS.


    My heart goes out to those, including some members on here possibly, that were devastated by Hurricane Katrina.

    I hope you don't mind, but I took some pics with my cell phone & I'm going to post a few here.


    Please remember these people in prayer, and help anyway you can. Many were insured, but the insurance companies are not paying up. (If you had flood ins, they'd tell the home owners the damage was from wind-type scams.)


    Homes, restaurants, gas stations, and casinos are totally destroyed there. Some completely gone, some only leaving signs or slabs.




    A home, completely destroyed.


    Another home, completely destroyed.


    A gutted out inn, or apt building.


    What's left of the Taco Bell that was on the shoreline.
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   dianah
    Thank you for the reminder, Mi'Shelle.
  4. by   tnbutterfly
    Mi'Shelle......Yes the devastation is unbelievable. I was deployed to Louisiana for 3 weeks with the Red Cross shortly after Katrina struck. I was in a shelter in Gonzales which is located between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. We drove to New Orleans and surrounding areas and I couldn't believe what I saw. It was very overwhelming. Most of our 800 plus shelter residents were from New Orleans and lost their homes. It was so sad to see them with all they had left stuffed under their cots.

    I went back to the Gulf Coast in April on a mission trip. It was surprising to see things in much the same state of devastation so many months after the hurricanes struck. I am planning on returning to the area this spring on another mission trip.

    Once you see the area, you can't get it out of your mind. I have hundreds of pictures and have done several presentations to various civic groups, colleges, etc. It is important that we don't forget that these people still need help.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    Thank you Mi'Shelle and tnbutterfly!

    There are still insufficient schools or hospital beds. there is no trauma center in the city at all.
    Hospitals can't oped beds because there is no housing nurses can afford.
    City workers including firefighters and police are still living on a cruise ship.

    I'm sure there are many ways we can help. I give to the Musicians Health Clinic and Habitat for Humanity.
  6. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from spacenurse
    Thank you Mi'Shelle and tnbutterfly!

    There are still insufficient schools or hospital beds. there is no trauma center in the city at all.
    Hospitals can't oped beds because there is no housing nurses can afford.
    City workers including firefighters and police are still living on a cruise ship.

    I'm sure there are many ways we can help. I give to the Musicians Health Clinic and Habitat for Humanity.

    I am stationed at Keesler AFB Hospital here in Biloxi. All the hospitals are back up and running. Hospital beds haven't been a real issue for a few months. As far as I know, except Keesler AFB's hospital, all the hospitals are back to pre-Katrina operations/levels (or close to). I don't think anyone is living on cruise ships anymore...I believe they moved the last ones out a few months ago( I could be wrong on that one). As far as the schools there is a very uneven mix i.e. where my kids go to school they are only about 1/5 the capacity they were before the storm but the elementary school a few miles away is double to triple the capacity it was before Katrina. Housing continues to be a problem, but you can find a decent place to live. Housing prices are more expensive, but they seem to have finally leveled out.

    There is still years and years left of rebuilding, but things are slowly getting better.
  7. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from Fun2Care
    We traveled home from Florida by way of Biloxi and Gulf Port, MS.


    My heart goes out to those, including some members on here possibly, that were devastated by Hurricane Katrina.

    I hope you don't mind, but I took some pics with my cell phone & I'm going to post a few here.


    Please remember these people in prayer, and help anyway you can. Many were insured, but the insurance companies are not paying up. (If you had flood ins, they'd tell the home owners the damage was from wind-type scams.)


    Homes, restaurants, gas stations, and casinos are totally destroyed there. Some completely gone, some only leaving signs or slabs.




    A home, completely destroyed.


    Another home, completely destroyed.


    A gutted out inn, or apt building.


    What's left of the Taco Bell that was on the shoreline.

    The third was a hotel, but the name escapes me. Here is a link of before and after photos. Renewal -- SunHerald.com
  8. by   UM Review RN
    I just saw When the Levees Broke the other night. To me what was the most heartbreaking is how our government abandoned all of the Katrina victims.
  9. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I just saw When the Levees Broke the other night. To me what was the most heartbreaking is how our government abandoned all of the Katrina victims.

    Here is an article from Popular Mechanics that makes for very interesting reading. Debunking The Myths of Katrina - March 2006 Cover Story - Popular Mechanics

    This is the excerpt from page 2:

    "GOVERNMENT RESPONDED RAPIDLY

    MYTH: "The aftermath of Katrina will go down as one of the worst abandonments of Americans on American soil ever in U.S. history."--Aaron Broussard, president, Jefferson Parish, La., Meet the Press, NBC, Sept. 4, 2005

    REALITY: Bumbling by top disaster-management officials fueled a perception of general inaction, one that was compounded by impassioned news anchors. In fact, the response to Hurricane Katrina was by far the largest--and fastest-rescue effort in U.S. history, with nearly 100,000 emergency personnel arriving on the scene within three days of the storm's landfall.

    Dozens of National Guard and Coast Guard helicopters flew rescue operations that first day--some just 2 hours after Katrina hit the coast. Hoistless Army helicopters improvised rescues, carefully hovering on rooftops to pick up survivors. On the ground, "guardsmen had to chop their way through, moving trees and recreating roadways," says Jack Harrison of the National Guard. By the end of the week, 50,000 National Guard troops in the Gulf Coast region had saved 17,000 people; 4000 Coast Guard personnel saved more than 33,000.

    These units had help from local, state and national responders, including five helicopters from the Navy ship Bataan and choppers from the Air Force and police. The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries dispatched 250 agents in boats. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), state police and sheriffs' departments launched rescue flotillas. By Wednesday morning, volunteers and national teams joined the effort, including eight units from California's Swift Water Rescue. By Sept. 8, the waterborne operation had rescued 20,000.

    While the press focused on FEMA's shortcomings, this broad array of local, state and national responders pulled off an extraordinary success--especially given the huge area devastated by the storm. Computer simulations of a Katrina-strength hurricane had estimated a worst-case-scenario death toll of more than 60,000 people in Louisiana. The actual number was 1077 in that state.

    NEXT TIME: Any fatalities are too many. Improvements hinge on building more robust communications networks and stepping up predisaster planning to better coordinate local and national resources."
  10. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Wow...it's amazing how one story about how people are suffering can get turned into a Government issue.


    I personnally saw way more devestation in MS, than in LA.


    I also know that many trucks were waiting to go into NO, but it was too dangerous to let them in..well, at least the Church of God trucks couldn't immmediately go in.





    wtbcrna, thanks for posting that.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from wtbcrna
    I am stationed at Keesler AFB Hospital here in Biloxi. All the hospitals are back up and running. Hospital beds haven't been a real issue for a few months. As far as I know, except Keesler AFB's hospital, all the hospitals are back to pre-Katrina operations/levels (or close to). I don't think anyone is living on cruise ships anymore...I believe they moved the last ones out a few months ago( I could be wrong on that one). As far as the schools there is a very uneven mix i.e. where my kids go to school they are only about 1/5 the capacity they were before the storm but the elementary school a few miles away is double to triple the capacity it was before Katrina. Housing continues to be a problem, but you can find a decent place to live. Housing prices are more expensive, but they seem to have finally leveled out.

    There is still years and years left of rebuilding, but things are slowly getting better.
    Thank you for correcting my errors. I was thinking about New Orleans too.
    It is too much to take yout people whose homes and businesses are destroyed go on.

    A nurse who evacuated after her home flooded told me to always put documents in a zip lock bag in your safe deposit box. They are fire proof but everything in hers was destroyed when the bank flooded.
  12. by   tnbutterfly
    Quote from wtbcrna
    here is an article from popular mechanics that makes for very interesting reading. debunking the myths of katrina - march 2006 cover story - popular mechanics

    this is the excerpt from page 2:

    "government responded rapidly

    myth: "the aftermath of katrina will go down as one of the worst abandonments of americans on american soil ever in u.s. history."--aaron broussard, president, jefferson parish, la., meet the press, nbc, sept. 4, 2005

    reality: bumbling by top disaster-management officials fueled a perception of general inaction, one that was compounded by impassioned news anchors. in fact, the response to hurricane katrina was by far the largest--and fastest-rescue effort in u.s. history, with nearly 100,000 emergency personnel arriving on the scene within three days of the storm's landfall.

    dozens of national guard and coast guard helicopters flew rescue operations that first day--some just 2 hours after katrina hit the coast. hoistless army helicopters improvised rescues, carefully hovering on rooftops to pick up survivors. on the ground, "guardsmen had to chop their way through, moving trees and recreating roadways," says jack harrison of the national guard. by the end of the week, 50,000 national guard troops in the gulf coast region had saved 17,000 people; 4000 coast guard personnel saved more than 33,000.

    these units had help from local, state and national responders, including five helicopters from the navy ship bataan and choppers from the air force and police. the louisiana department of wildlife and fisheries dispatched 250 agents in boats. the federal emergency management agency (fema), state police and sheriffs' departments launched rescue flotillas. by wednesday morning, volunteers and national teams joined the effort, including eight units from california's swift water rescue. by sept. 8, the waterborne operation had rescued 20,000.

    while the press focused on fema's shortcomings, this broad array of local, state and national responders pulled off an extraordinary success--especially given the huge area devastated by the storm. computer simulations of a katrina-strength hurricane had estimated a worst-case-scenario death toll of more than 60,000 people in louisiana. the actual number was 1077 in that state.

    next time: any fatalities are too many. improvements hinge on building more robust communications networks and stepping up predisaster planning to better coordinate local and national resources."

    thank you wtbcrna for posting this. we hear too much about the shortcomings of the rescue attempts and disaster relief efforts. we must remember the tremendous magnitude of the devastation. i personally saw fema, the red cross, the national guard and other organizations working hand in hand to try to work with hundreds of people in the red cross shelter i was stationed at to provide for their immediate and future needs.
  13. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from spacenurse
    A nurse who evacuated after her home flooded told me to always put documents in a zip lock bag in your safe deposit box. They are fire proof but everything in hers was destroyed when the bank flooded.


    Oh my....I wouldn't have thought of that either!



    It's so sad....people without homes, their employment has ended because the building doesn't exist anymore etc....


    I hope 2007 makes for a better year for all affected by ANY hurricane or other distaster!
  14. by   tnbutterfly
    one of the ladies i talked to told me they keep an axe in the attic just in case. she was one of the ones who actually had to use that axe to chop a hole in the attic to get out to safety when her house became submerged by the floodwaters. she had such a sad story to tell about her mom who wasn't able to get out.

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