aussie needs help with american ingredients

  1. I have recently found a great recipe on an American website, which lists converted rice in it's ingredients. I don't know what this is. At a guess it may be white rice, or maybe cooked rice.

    Can any of you help please. thanks.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   kitty29
    Quote from jax
    I have recently found a great recipe on an American website, which lists converted rice in it's ingredients. I don't know what this is. At a guess it may be white rice, or maybe cooked rice.

    Can any of you help please. thanks.
    this is minute rice, it cooks in about 10 mins. Uncle Bens is the one I like, they have white & brown rice.
  4. by   jax
    many thanks kitty 29.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    UNCLE BEN's ( a brand name) is synonymous with "coverted rice".....
  6. by   kids
    Converted rice is also called "parboiled" rice, it cooks in about 10 minutes and gives you "perfect" grains and no clumping.

    "Minute Rice" is a brand name for instant rice and is added to boiling water and let stand 5 minutes. Grains don't clump but has (IMO) an odd texture.
    Last edit by kids on Jul 16, '04
  7. by   Farkinott
    While we're at it, how much is in a "stick" of butter?
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    Converted rice is indeed 'parboiled'. It is simmered with the lid on for 20 minutes, then wait 5 minutes off the heat and before removing the lid.

    Converted rice cooks with the grains separated, not stuck together. The explanation on the box years ago was that it is 'parboiled at increased pressure' Somehow there is higher vitamin content that regular white rice. I often substitue brown or converted rice adjusting the cooking time and liquid to the type of rice.

    A 'stick' of butter is 1/4 pound.
  9. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from spacenurse

    A 'stick' of butter is 1/4 pound.
    or 8 tablespoons, or 1/2 cup.

    farkinott, you crack me up. :chuckle

    leslie
  10. by   mshultz
    A quarter pound is about 113 grams.
    A half-cup is about 118 ml.

    This reminds me of a discussion on a clarinet forum about relative clarinet weights. Many of the postings were subjective (my clarinet feels heavier than most). I took my clarinet to work and weighed it (I'm a sewage worker, not a nurse), and then posted the weight in both metric units and American conversions (sewage labs are entirely metric). This was appreciated by the international posters, who are not familiar with pounds and ounces.
  11. by   Farkinott
    [QUOTE=mshultz]A quarter pound is about 113 grams.
    A half-cup is about 118 ml.

    This reminds me of a discussion on a clarinet forum about relative clarinet weights. Many of the postings were subjective (my clarinet feels heavier than most). I took my clarinet to work and weighed it (I'm a sewage worker, not a nurse), and then posted the weight in both metric units and American conversions (sewage labs are entirely metric). This was appreciated by the international posters, who are not familiar with pounds and ounces.[/QUOTE

    Clarinet as in the reed instrument?!! Man i am confused! No disrespect, but what is a plumber/drainer doing in a nurses forum???
  12. by   mshultz
    Farkinott:

    Yes, I am referring to the reed instrument. My clarinet is a Buffet Festival Greenline. The clarinet forum members were interested in weight as one of the variables in clarinet acoustics. The goal is to achieve the ultimate in clarinet sound, that of Mr. Acker Bilk (just kidding!).

    As far as to why I am here in this nurses' forum: it is much more interesting than the plumbing, drains, and sewers forum. Seriously, though, this is a great source of information, providing much information not available in textbooks.

    I had become hooked on aspirin to control tension headaches, and had been using 5-6 a day when a duodenal ulcer hemorrhage resulted in the loss of about 4 units of blood. I ended up in the Emergency Department, followed by the Critical Care Unit, in May 2003. They treated me very well, and I am grateful for the care that I received. This forum helps me to understand my course of treatment, gives me a chance to talk about what I experienced from the viewpoint of a patient, and lets me show my appreciation (so many posts seem to be critical of the nursing care received by the patient). Also, my reactions can be different, so someone has to explain to me not only how a normal patient reacts, but why they react that way.

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