Army-wife, RN

  1. I am needing some advice from any one familar with the army life. My husband is being stationed in Korea. It is a 1 year, unaccompanied tour. (which of course means I cannot go) I was thinking about going myself and trying to find a job on my own. Does anyone know anything about nursing in Korea, or have some resources for me. I am searching desperately.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am not an ARMY wife but AIR FORCE. I have a lot of experience in having to cope alone with my spouse overseas..handling kids, job, etc. PM me if I can be of help to you.
  4. by   NurzofFaith
    I wanted to add to this and say while I havent had my husband go on a year remote I have dealt with separation.

    I honestly dont know a thing about Korea and the job possibilities either, but I am a shoulder to lean on and am a great listener if you need one

    I'm only a PM or email away.

    God Bless,

    ~Channa Proud Air Force wife to Joe
  5. by   nurse-in-boots
    Because it would be an unaccompanied tour, you face many problems. First, the army will not pay for your move there. Just your hubby's and a little personal stuff. They do have an army hospital in Seoul, which may be far from the DMZ. (De-militerized zone). Yall may still be seperated by a few hours drive. You should check with them (the army hospital in Seoul) if you still plan on moving there on your own.

    BTW... your hubby will get 30 days leave after 6 mos (called mid tour leave) then he will go back for only 5 mos. Its really not that bad. Seperation is hard, but sometimes it has to be done. At least he will get choice of duty station (within reason) on his return.

    If you need anything else, PM me... been an army wife for 9 yrs, and am in the army myself. Good luck in your reserch.
  6. by   nowplayingEDRN
    Nurse-In-Boots....

    I was just going to say usually if the tour is unaccompanied, it means that they are being stationed near the DMZ(demilitarized zone) and there are no accomodations for family.

    love4neos,

    In addition, when they are stationed up by the DMZ, they get sent out into the field regularly. I would recommend doing as Nurse-In-Boots suggests and hang tight on the home front. I know that this is easy for me to say not being married to anyone in the Army but working an a MTF (fancy abbrev for Army Hospital), I hear alot of the folks talk. Check around on your base, as there are usually others in your same situation or those that have been through it before and they can be a great source of companionship and support for you while he is away. Good luck with whatever choice you make.

    Christie
  7. by   Shamrock
    I can't offer any knowledge about it but you do
    have my support.
  8. by   jnette
    I work with a tech who has recently gotten out of the service himself and I know that he was stationed in Korea for quite some time... recently, too.

    I can ask him and perhaps he will have some info I can pass back to you.

    Hang in there. It's hard, but doable. I remember growing up with Daddy gone 6 mos. to a year MANY a time. Mom survived. You will, too.
  9. by   nurse-in-boots
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by nurse-in-boots
    [ They do have an army hospital in Seoul, which may be far from the DMZ. (De-militerized zone). Yall may still be seperated by a few hours drive.

    Untaimed: Thats what I was telling her... may be quite a drive for her to see her hubby. Best of luck to her in whatever decision she makes.
  10. by   chiefswife
    Army Wife,

    I too am an Army Wife and my husband did his remote (in Korea) last year - July 01 - July 02. I can tell you that there was one wife w/ the unit. She moved there on her own and was able to get work on post.

    I hope you do not feel like I am being nosy or rude, but I hope you will let me give you a little insight. Korea is HARD - it's hard on the ones left behind and on the service member. My husband and I's marrige is based on 12 years of friendship prior to the marrige, so I feel that we have a great one, but Korea almost broke us. If you feel that you can not be w/o him, then go. Depending on where he is stationed, he maybe able to extend it to a two year and have you command sponsored over there (the Army would pay then). This very much depends on duty station and rank.

    I had a ton on support - Mom, Dad, and in-laws. If you don't currently live at or near "home home", then maybe you could go there so you could have family support.

    Please remember two things: 1) the Army has a sence of hurmor - it's just not funny! and 2) You are an Army wife, not matter what life (outside or inside the Army) throws at you, you will surrvive!

    If you would like to PM me, please feel free. I've "been there, done that" and would love it if I never have to do it again. I would love to hear from you - good days, bad days, or just days days.

    Good Luck and hang tough, Army Wife!
  11. by   nowplayingEDRN
    Just giving a bit of support to your input in this situation, Boots, that's all. I know that if they make Korea a unaccompanied tour, they usually recommend the family stay behind unless it is an accompanied tour or as it was stated by sara, you havesponsorship from someone in command. And I agree, it does go according to duty station and rank. West Point seems to be a launching pad for PCSing to Korea both for officer and anlisted alike. Was just putting MHO in and trying to be supportive where I can. Did not mean to step on anyones toes or be repetetive.
  12. by   renerian
    I have not been in your situation but offer you words of support. Sounds like some great people here know how you feel though.

    Hugs,

    renerian
  13. by   love4neos
    I appreciate all the support. I still have not decided if I am going to take the plunge and try to go to Korea. I really love the job I got here, but the pay isn't ideal. I really wanted to save as much $$$$ as I could while he is gone. I'm torn.
  14. by   dianah
    Tough decision . . .

    Weigh options well, DISCUSS them well W/HUBBY, Pray about it (or whatever is your habit to do when facing a fork in the proverbial road), make your choice and go for it.

    Good luck to you.

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