Americans Question Bush on 9/11 Intelligence

  1. http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/inde...m/itemID/13469

    Quote from www.angus-reid.com/polls/index.cfm/fuseaction/viewItem/itemID/13469
    Many adults in the United States believe the current federal government has not been completely forthcoming on the issue of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, according to a poll by the New York Times and CBS News. 53 per cent of respondents think the Bush administration is hiding something, and 28 per cent believe it is lying.
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    Ummmmmmm.........there are some patriotic Americans who have suspected this all along, ever since Bush first started talking about Iraq instead of concentrating on catching bin Laden and his followers. Who NEVER believed the administration was telling us the whole truth about why it was itching for war in that country when it had nothing whatsoever to do with the 9/11 attacks. Who spoke out against the invasion before it even started, much to the dismay (and disgust) of other patriotic Americans who thought Bush could do no wrong after 9/11.

    We were scorned as traitors then; I know I myself often felt as though mine were a lone voice in the wilderness, even here on allnurses. Funny how much of the country has come around to a similar point of view three and a half years later.........even many of those who still support the war are wondering how truthful the administration was in its efforts to garner that support.

    Sadly, it's all water under the bridge.........~3000 dead Americans and untold numbers of Iraqis later, we are no closer to being able to get OUT of the sandbox than we were in 2003, as we have to stay and fix what we've broken, as well as support the fledgling democracy we have installed there. Bin Laden is still at large, the Taliban is growing once again, North Korea is testing nukes under our noses, and Israel is a constant worry. But we're bogged down in Iraq, and leaving now would destroy even the minimal stability that exists in the Middle East. And as much as I hate to concede this point, we've got to finish what we started there or we will never again know a moment's peace.

    Sorry to say, the invasion of Iraq was perhaps the best marketing tool for terrorist recruitment ever invented; we can't unring that bell simply because a slim majority of the American people now believe our leaders might have deceived us. And I fear that it's only a matter of time until there is another massive attack on our shores. My only hope is that it won't take another such catastrophe for us to finally learn that in times like these, we must demand MORE, not less, accountability from the men and women we choose to serve to represent us in the larger world beyond our back yards.

    But I won't hold my breath.
    Last edit by VivaLasViejas on Oct 15, '06
  4. by   jnette
    Quote from mjlrn97

    Sorry to say, the invasion of Iraq was perhaps the best marketing tool for terrorist recruitment ever invented; we can't unring that bell simply because a slim majority of the American people now believe our leaders might have deceived us. My only hope is that we will finally learn from this and demand MORE, not less, accountability from the men and women we choose to serve to represent us in the larger world beyond our back yards.

    But I won't hold my breath.
    Great big fat DITTO there, Marla.

    I can't help but wonder if we will ever know a moment's peace REGARDLESS of which way we go now... if we stay and finish the job, or if we pull out.
    Seems like we're damned if we do and damned if we don't. :stone
  5. by   VivaLasViejas
    You've got a point there, jnette...........regardless of whether we support or oppose Iraq, or whether we approve or disapprove of what the administration is doing, there are people in the world who want to kill us simply because we are Americans. Rich Americans, poor Americans, white, black, brown Americans, Protestant, Catholic, Jewish Americans, native-born, naturalized, even baby Americans. That's something I don't think most of us can fully comprehend.........I know I don't.
  6. by   jnette
    Quote from mjlrn97
    You've got a point there, jnette...........regardless of whether we support or oppose Iraq, or whether we approve or disapprove of what the administration is doing, there are people in the world who want to kill us simply because we are Americans. Rich Americans, poor Americans, white, black, brown Americans, Protestant, Catholic, Jewish Americans, native-born, naturalized, even baby Americans. That's something I don't think most of us can fully comprehend.........I know I don't.
    Agree. But this hating of Americans has not always been the case. It is a more recent phenomenon. Granted, there are always some who have felt disdain for our ways and our culture, and there have been attempts in the past (even successful ones) at harming our interests. But I feel that now we have only emboldened them by our actions over the past 5 years, and that there is no turning back the clock. There will always be extremisits, but I can't help but believe they now feel far more powerful and more prepared than ever to bring down the "Great Satan".

    And what allies we had in the past are now nowhere to be found anymore.

    Quite tragic.
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from jnette
    But I feel that now we have only emboldened them by our actions over the past 5 years, and that there is no turning back the clock. There will always be extremisits, but I can't help but believe they now feel far more powerful and more prepared than ever to bring down the "Great Satan".

    And what allies we had in the past are now nowhere to be found anymore.

    Quite tragic.
    ITA, jnette.........and the stink of it is, we brought that last part on ourselves.

    There are times when I just want to shout to the world (which no doubt wonders what madness has possessed this country during these past few years): PLEASE don't judge all Americans by the Bush administration!! We don't all agree with what it is doing; we don't all believe Bush is our savior; indeed, many of us have actively opposed his policies since his 2000 appointment---oops, sorry, election---to the presidency........and will continue to oppose them until the day he leaves office.

    One of my staff members has a bumper sticker on her car that says "49% of Americans agree with 99% of the rest of the world". (Of course, she put the sticker there back in 2004........methinks that number has come up a wee bit since then.) I know it's not currently popular to worry about what the rest of the world thinks, but if we learned nothing else from 9/11, we SHOULD have learned that we don't exist in a vacuum!

    Don't get me wrong. There is no satisfaction from Bush's dropping poll numbers. There is no vindication in the fact that Americans are finally waking up to the deception, the poorly conceived and executed policies, and the creeping evil that have characterized this administration. There is no triumph in "I told you so", even though we DID, years ago.

    All there is, is a growing fear that it may already be too late to undo the damage done, not to only our standing in the world, but to our nation's soul---a soul that once would never have tolerated this administration's repeated assaults on the Constitution, that once cared what its allies thought, that once valued the freedoms that generations of Americans have fought and died to preserve. Even when a new President and Congress are elected, it may take years, even decades, to win back the trust of old friends and gain the good will of new ones...........and in the meantime, Islamic extremists will continue to try to destroy us, and we will continue to fight them, largely alone.

  8. by   sanctuary
    There is a way to extract ourselves from the sand-pit, but the trouble is, we would lose control of the oil. Iraq's constitution devides Iraq into 18 areas, like states. If 2 or more ajacent areas want to, they can form a region. If the Kurds want to form a Kurdish Region, and have it guarded by Kurds, (who know what Kurds look like), then Sunni and Sheite could hook up, and establish their own regions, each self protected from maurading "others."
    That would leave the oil fields to them, not to Halliburton and other war-for-profit companies.
  9. by   indigo girl
    Quote from sanctuary
    There is a way to extract ourselves from the sand-pit, but the trouble is, we would lose control of the oil. Iraq's constitution devides Iraq into 18 areas, like states. If 2 or more ajacent areas want to, they can form a region. If the Kurds want to form a Kurdish Region, and have it guarded by Kurds, (who know what Kurds look like), then Sunni and Sheite could hook up, and establish their own regions, each self protected from maurading "others."
    That would leave the oil fields to them, not to Halliburton and other war-for-profit companies.
    OH NO!!! Say it isn't so!!!
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    The commission headed by Secretary of State for President George H.W. Bush, James Baker, agrees.
    http://www.nysun.com/pf.php?id=41371

    General concedes failure in Baghdad
    Bush acknowledges comparison to '68 Tet offensive in Vietnam
    ...Maj. Gen. William Caldwell, the top U.S. military spokesman in Iraq, announced that the American-led crackdown on violence in Baghdad had failed...

    ...Vice President Dick Cheney, an architect of the administration's Iraq policies, said the United States was "not looking for an exit strategy."
    "We're looking for victory," Cheney said in an interview posted on Time magazine's Web site Thursday.

    But some analysts expect the Iraq policy to take a new direction after the election....
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...NGJ9LT21H1.DTL

    Richard L. Armitage, deputy secretary of state from 2001 to 2005 has a plan:
    http://www.nj.com/printer/printer.ss...560.xml&coll=2


    "When will we ever learn?" - Pete Seeger
  11. by   VivaLasViejas
    You know, up until the past year, if you characterized the Iraq debacle as reminiscent of a certain war in Southeast Asia some forty years ago, you'd get shouted down by a gazillion voices screaming "Iraq is not another Vietnam. IRAQ IS NOT ANOTHER VIETNAM". Of course it is. The only difference is we haven't lost 58,000 American men and women there yet. Oh yeah, and we haven't occupied the country for a dozen years yet. But we will. You can count on it.
  12. by   indigo girl
    http://www.nysun.com/pf.php?id=41371

    Quote from www.nysun.com/pf.php?id=41371
    ...Mr. Baker was careful to say he believed the jury was still out on whether Iraq was a success or a failure. But he also hastened to distinguish between a Middle East that was "democratic" and one that was merely "representative."

    "Stabilizing Iraq will be impossible without greater cooperation from Iran and Syria," the "Stability First" paper says.

    Because of the politically explosive topic of the Baker commission, the panel has agreed not to release its findings until after the November 7 elections.
    What is the difference between a gov't that is democratic and one that is representative? Does that apply to us too?

    Cooperation with Iran and Syria? Too late for that...

    But, of course, let's wait until after the elections, the people don't need to know this....
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 21, '06
  13. by   indigo girl
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...NGJ9LT21H1.DTL

    Quote from /www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/10/20/MNGJ9LT21H1.DTL
    Maj. Gen. William Caldwell, the top U.S. military spokesman in Iraq, announced that the American-led crackdown on violence in Baghdad had failed...

    "Gen. Caldwell's admission is yet another indication that the enemy is winning," said Loren Thompson, a defense analyst at the Lexington Institute, a centrist think tank in Arlington, Va. "Commanders in the field are beginning to suggest a lack of success."
    Is it enough yet?
  14. by   indigo girl
    Richard L. Armitage, deputy secretary of state from 2001 to 2005 has a plan:
    http://www.nj.com/printer/printer.ss...560.xml&coll=2



    Quote from /www.nj.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/news-8/1161231019323560.xml&coll=2

    Richard L. Armitage, deputy secretary of state from 2001 to 2005, advocated an incremental reduction of U.S. troops while Iraq's fledgling democracy struggles to overcome sectarian violence.

    "We notify the Iraqis that we're going to be drawing down a reasonable but careful percentage of our troops over a reasonable interval of months

    ...It will give our population some hope and enthusiasm that this is not a never-ending affair. And also it will put the heat on the Iraqis, because ladies and gentlemen, we can't win this militarily. By the way, we can't lose this militarily."

    "A lot of us, including me, are going to have a lot to answer for," Armitage said.
    Yes, yes, indeed, a lot to answer for.

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