A question for those debating atheism/creationism/evolution, etc....

  1. Instead of starting a new thread dealing with the same 'stuff', i'll focus my question towards those who are firmly convinced that they are atheist/agnostic/scientific/etc....

    I'm very curious as to your personal 'moral code'. Meaning, how do you determine right/wrong? This may seem a silly or simple question....but i'm curious nonetheless(sp?).
    For example, murder is wrong (i'll assume you agree with me on this ). So then, why would an atheist/agnostic 'beleive' that murder is wrong? Simply because it's the law? Another reason?
    Is the fact that murder is 'wrong' a universal 'truth'??..or no?
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  2. 44 Comments

  3. by   iliel
    I'm not too sure what your looking for, but I'll say that, Yes, I think murder is wrong, taking another life is wrong. I don't need to believe in God to know that I shouldn't rob another human or thier family of thier right to live. I have lots of the same "major" morals as people who believe, but, when it comes to the "small" morals, such a premarital sex, drinking, etc...as long as these things are done in moderation, then I see no problem with it.
    One of the main reasons I am a non believer is because I don't want to force my views on others, I think everyone has a right to believe what they wish and do with their life what they want. I am not going to live my life for something I don't know exisits.
  4. by   iliel
    also, I don't know if it's right to ask people about their personal moral code without posting yours....don't mean to sound rude, but maybe you should tell us why you believe something like murder is wrong or what your personal moral code is. are you a beleiver?
    Last edit by iliel on Aug 14, '03
  5. by   Tweety
    I inherently know what is right or wrong. Part of that is from the society I'm in. If I break the law that is wrong. (Whether or not I agree with it or not.)

    Part of it was the way I was brought up. (I was brought up in an agnostic home.). I was raised by a German mom and Army Officer dad, who instilled a strong work ethic. I still remember my dad echoing in my head "the thing I hate most in the world is a liar."

    Part of it is genetic. It's hard to describe, but I get a bad feeling, a sick feeling when I do wrong. Not I go around doing bad things. But say I do something like snap at some innocent person I work with because I'm stress. It nags at me until I can make amends.

    I do what's right not because of some fear of going to hell, or that bad things happen, or "what goes around comes around", but because I just know it's right and when I do wrong my "insides, or concious, or what some may even call the Holy Spirit" lets me know I need to set things straight.

    Am I making sense?
  6. by   Rustyhammer
    I'm also unsure of the reasoning behind the question.
    Are you saying non-believers have no morals or at least you are wondering where they get their morals?
    Anyway, I was raised to be respectful. Respectful of myself, other people and their property, polite and curtious to others.
    We were taught to tell the truth and that all life has value (even though you may have to really look for it).
    We were taught to help those who were helping themselves (as opposed to letting those take advantage of you).
    And we were told of the basic concept of Karma.
    All this and I don't ever remember my parents talking to me about god.
    -Russell
  7. by   studentOH
    I think because you're asking that that kind of "thinking" is outside your personal scope.

    *Everyone* sets their OWN moral code. Some use the Bible/religion as a guide, but they set their own. Many Christians are perfectly "OK" with murder in some forms.

    Your question implies that religious people are unable to reason between right and wrong for themselves. I would hope that other Christians wouldn't agree with that. If you follow certain Biblical laws that's great, but you choose which ones to follow, etc.

    Atheists have to reason for themselves, just like everyone else. Some may use religious beliefs as a guide, but they make the final decision.

    Brian
  8. by   studentOH
    Originally posted by Rustyhammer
    I'm also unsure of the reasoning behind the question.
    Are you saying non-believers have no morals or at least you are wondering where they get their morals?
    Anyway, I was raised to be respectful. Respectful of myself, other people and their property, polite and curtious to others.
    We were taught to tell the truth and that all life has value (even though you may have to really look for it).
    We were taught to help those who were helping themselves (as opposed to letting those take advantage of you).
    And we were told of the basic concept of Karma.
    All this and I don't ever remember my parents talking to me about god.
    -Russell
    Easy Rusty, some churches teach that non-believers are messed up in the head. We're clearly unable to think for ourselves because we don't have God in our lives to tell us what to do. We're also just "blocked Christians" who're desperately seeking answers about Jesus, just like two thirds of the Earth's population.

    Can't believe you made it through nursing school and are raising children without Him, Rusty

    and btw, I realize most people don't think this. No one needs to tell me.

    Brian
  9. by   Rustyhammer
    Seems to me that without god you are more able to think for yourself. I have even heard reference to christians as "sheep".
    Not a complimentary term is it?
    I hope I don't get flamed for using that term. I really don't mean to offend anyone.
    -Russell
  10. by   LauraF, RN
    I think that I'm more agnostic then atheist. I believe that you don't do to someone else what you don't want done to you. It is wrong to steal, rape or murder. I believe that what one does in private is their own affair, as long as it does not effect anyone else negatively. Why do christians, catholics and other religions believe what they are told? Why do they get so angry when people like me, ask for proof? I might believe in God or Jesus if there is some proof, not word of mouth. There is proof that man used to resemble an ape. There is proof of dinosaurs. This is hard fact, bones etc....not word of mouth.
  11. by   donmurray
    Humanists are essentially agnostic or atheist, and their "moral code" is much like this......although I stand to be corrected..

    this world and this life are all we have;

    we should try to live full and happy lives ourselves and, as part of
    this, make it easier for other people to do the same;

    all situations and people deserve to be judged on their merits by standards of reason and humanity;

    individuality and social cooperation are equally important
  12. by   LauraF, RN
    Very well said DonMurray!
  13. by   aimeee
    My basic rule is this...my "rights" end at the point where they infringe upon someone elses. I try to live by the "golden rule", but not because anyone told me to, but because it makes good sense to me.
  14. by   PennyLane
    My goodness! I certainly hope you don't think that non-religious people can't have morals! Where do I get mine? From my upbringing, and from what I see in the world and how I think the world should be different. Just because I don't think God is going to punish me if I hurt someone else doesn't mean that I don't think it's wrong to do so.

    I see beauty in nature, and in others. I also see a lot of pain and suffering in the world. I don't want to suffer myself, nor do I want others to. My morals may not be written down in a book, but they are real, nonetheless. I even feel bad if I accidentally step on a bug.

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