(Embryonic) Stem cells help mum walk

  1. A BRISBANE woman who was paralysed in a car accident is walking again after receiving controversial stem-cell treatment in India.
    Australian doctors told mother-of-three Sonya Smith 18 months ago that she would spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair.
    Her spine was broken after she was crushed by her car when the handbrake failed and it rolled down a hill.
    But after eight weeks of embryonic stem-cell injections, Mrs Smith, 45, is now able to stand with the aid of calipers and has regained bowel and bladder control.
    She says she has recovered "deep sensation" in her thighs and feet and has been able to swing her legs.


    ...
    "Of course there are concerns about stem cells, but Sonya wouldn't have had a chance."
    Mrs Smith is one of more than 300 patients who have been treated in New Delhi by controversial stem-cell pioneer Dr Geeta Shroff.
    The treatment, forbidden in Australia, involves collecting stem cells from embryos and injecting them into injured or diseased patients.
    When taken from embryos, the cells are undeveloped and seem better able to replace damaged tissue.


    http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/s...007200,00.html

    :spin:
    •  
  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   DarrenWright
    And yet Dr. Groff refuses to allow anyone to review her work.

    http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/11-17-2005-81689.asp

    Dr Shroff points to satisfied patients but there is no scientific proof that her therapy works. She would not discuss how her stems cells were purified or tested. There was no explanation of how the cells functioned in the body. Her clinic has not run any tests to analyse how the body is affected by the treatment, and western experts say that, potentially, she could be pushing an important therapy into the "realms of quackery", that her work is tantamount to "human experimentation".
  4. by   HM2VikingRN
    One of the best arguments for federal funding as it would bring the research under the purview of ethics review panels....
    Last edit by HM2VikingRN on Jun 18, '07
  5. by   DarrenWright
    Any kind of research like this requires IRB review anyways, doesn't matter who is paying for it.

    The clinical trials also require FDA oversight; again, matters not who pays. Otherwise, it was an unclever attempt to justify wrangling money for something that some people find immoral.
  6. by   ZASHAGALKA
    http://article.nationalreview.com/?q...jAxZmMyOWZlM2U
    By Mitt Romney:

    "... On Thursday, the Congress passed a bill that would for the first time use taxpayer dollars to encourage the destruction of embryos for research. Just as it is becoming increasingly clear that scientific ingenuity could offer a way around the divisive controversies of the stem-cell debate, congressional Democrats are working to stoke those very controversies. They have opted to exacerbate what they see as a political debate that works in their favor, rather than encourage a scientific solution that would work in America’s favor."

    "Support for ethical biomedical research should be part of our collective identity as a noble society. Instead of turning the quest for cures into a partisan battle, Congress should embrace the exciting emerging lines of research that could meet the goals of all sides in the stem-cell debate. A bill to support just such a positive approach to stem cell research passed the Senate in April by a whopping margin of 70 to 28. But the House Democratic leadership, choosing politics over the prospect of consensus on science, appears to be unwilling even to allow a vote on that hopeful legislation."


    Even in an article in favor of using ESC, Ellen Goodman acknowledges the honest truth of why ESC are REALLY important:

    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...goodman15.html

    "The stem-cell debate has been embedded in abortion politics from the get-go, locked into an argument over the moral status of an embryo. Even as science progresses, the politics stay stuck."

    This isn't a science debate, and hasn't been one in awhile. It's merely an attempt to legitimize a status for embryos that supports the pro-abortion debate. ESC is a perfect political tool, however, it is such an unwieldy scientific tool, that scientists are working overtime to develop a means to bypass the negative SCIENTIFIC consequences of ESC (host rejection and cancerous type runaway growths). THESE problems doom ESCR.

    That won't make the debate go away. As long as some believe that this is a wedge issue to legitimize abortion, ESC will have a place at the political table, long after its place at the scientific table is well, tabled.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Jun 15, '07
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    I haven't seen this film yet. One of the film makers was on the radio expressing great respect for some of the anti abortion activists he met and filmed.
    The question is what will happen to the frozen embryos?

  8. by   DarrenWright
    Quote from spacenurse
    I haven't seen this film yet. One of the film makers was on the radio expressing great respect for some of the anti abortion activists he met and filmed.
    The question is what will happen to the frozen embryos?
    I'm sure this is the question being asked by some. It's not the debate that we are getting involved in.

    Here's the deal; I won't tell you what to do with them if you don't demand my money to do it.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from DarrenWright
    I'm sure this is the question being asked by some. It's not the debate that we are getting involved in.

    Here's the deal; I won't tell you what to do with them if you don't demand my money to do it.
    I don't think it is ethical to "create" human embryos that may be frozen.
    I also cannot judge those who had children by IVF.
    Imagine knowing your brothers and sisters are frozen or discarded.
  10. by   DarrenWright
    Quote from spacenurse
    I don't think it is ethical to "create" human embryos that may be frozen.
    I also cannot judge those who had children by IVF.
    Imagine knowing your brothers and sisters are frozen or discarded.
    I've honestly never considered this topic. Even considering your clear and poignant observations, I'm not entirely sure I know where I stand. I'm definitely going to have to think about this one, and it may take a while.

close