Are Nurses Bad at English? English: the Forgotten Language...

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    I sat at my desk this beautiful morning, bright and awake. I was taking a moment of respite before bursting on to start my day when I heard the “ding” sound- that was my phone letting me know that I had received a text message. I picked up the phone from where it lay on my desk and took a quick peek. It was Charles saying “hi”. I typed “hello” and hit the “send” button.


    A few minutes later the “ding” sounded again and I picked up my phone to read the text message. It simply stated, hyd” . I took a breath and figured it out to translate to, “how’s your day?” By now a little irritation was starting to creep in, but slowly I tempered down on it, “I’m doing well., I typed and hit send again. I was still holding on to my phone when, ‘ahwrutpopped up on my screen.


    I lost it!


    Seeing red and with steam pouring from my ears, I quickly churned out, “And am I supposed to figure out what the heck you just typed up there?” It took me longer trying to decode the abbreviations, if you can call it that (and giving me a headache into the bargain) than simply texting in full sentences and words that we might understand.
    For some, it is no big deal, for others, it means being hip and for a few others, myself included, it is simply a pain in the rear. Why not have a little patience and type out your words? Understand me, no one has complete mastery of the English Language and we don’t claim to, but by Jove, give me something I can work with!


    I may not understand this absurd craze and energy to bastardize the language, truly I do not. And frankly, I really do not want to…just send me the freaking text message in full, so I can understand. Otherwise, just don’t expect me to try decoding it! I refuse.

    Signed,
    Concerned Millennial

    Which brings me to nursing? Why the mass of grammatical errors?

    PS: "Ahwrut" means "And how are you today?" FickleSticks! No Way
    Last edit by The_Optimist on Sep 14, '13
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  3. 28 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Some devices have a word limit, therefore making the "abbreviations" necessary. I understand how you would get frustrated if you were not use to the "text speak."

    Now for nurses making grammatical errors in their charting/documentation, that always looks so unprofessional to me. If that charting were to be used in a court case and they took notice of the spelling situation....you could find yourself in trouble. People make mistakes in spelling, we ARE human, but errors do happen. if I have time I try to proofread but may still miss something.

    I did have a new nurse once use ALL kinds of abbreviations in her charting, and she had to explain to me what all they meant, stating "Well this makes things more efficient!" She had made up her own form of "text speak" to use in a chart.....that was BEYOND frustrating....
    Glycerine82 and The_Optimist like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from HeatherGurl84
    Some devices have a word limit, therefore making the "abbreviations" necessary. I understand how you would get frustrated if you were not use to the "text speak."

    ..
    Hmm, so that could be it? See, I didn't think of that. I love love, your smiley by the way.Apropos!
  6. 1
    Perhaps you just need to ask "Charles" to text in complete words/sentences?
    KelRN215 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from The_Optimist
    Hmm, so that could be it? See, I didn't think of that. I love love, your smiley by the way.Apropos!
    haha Thanks and yes some phones/text devices due have a word limit, making abbreviations very necessay. The website Twitter has a word limit per posting also. Sometimes you have to get creative to carry on a convo.
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    Quote from HeatherGurl84
    haha Thanks and yes some phones/text devices due have a word limit, making abbreviations very necessay. The website Twitter has a word limit per posting also. Sometimes you have to get creative to carry on a convo.
    No, it's never necessary. Never, ever, ever.

    If someone texts me a message with "b4" in place of "before" or "2nyt" instead of "tonight", I instantly lose all respect for said person.

    I even get angry when I see traffic signs that say "thru" in stead of "through".
    Elvish, tntrn, GrnTea, and 6 others like this.
  9. 1
    Glad to know I am not the only one who feels this way.
    GrnTea likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    No, it's never necessary. Never, ever, ever.

    If someone texts me a message with "b4" in place of "before" or "2nyt" instead of "tonight", I instantly lose all respect for said person.

    I even get angry when I see traffic signs that say "thru" in stead of "through".
    well when your device has a word limit that would make it necessary to get out what you were trying to say without having to send 50 texts.....but that would be the only time I would say it would be needed.
  11. 2
    I don't think that this has anything to do with nursing. Plenty of people who aren't in nursing use text speak when sending texts.
    SoldierNurse22 and psu_213 like this.
  12. 3
    I understand using "text speak" in a text, though I don't and even my daughters don't. What I absolutely despise is when people use text speak in other communications. There is no excuse for that in an email, or even here on allnurses, where it is actually against terms of service. We have nurses who visit this web site from other nations, so that is the reason for requiring that the members here actually use standard English in their communications. Often, someone will complain about this rule, citing as the reason that they are using their phone to post. Sorry, I have a phone, and I can still easily type "you" with very little extra effort than typing "u." All too often, the only reason people use text speak is because they are lazy or they are functionally illiterate. And don't even get me started on how often people text things that would be best said in person, or at the very least, on the phone.
    GrnTea, i♥words, and KelRN215 like this.


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