Are your Thoughts Making You Old?

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    Levy believes these negative stereotypes of aging are so deeply entrenched in our culture that we are oblivious to them. And rejecting them is not a PC thing –- it’s a selfish means to living better.Levy believes that “becoming aware of their presence in everyday life is a first step toward questioning their validity.” She suggests that keeping a journal to become more sensitized to positive images and embodiments of aging could have significant health benefits.
    Here are some further suggestions:
    1. Become aware when you automatically default into a negative stereotype about getting old.
    2. Create a roster of older people whom you admire – Nelson Mandela, Toni Morrison, Jane Goodall, Paul Newman, Betty Ford, Madeline Albright, George H.W. Bush, Joan Didion, Maya Angelou, John Updike, Judi Dench.
    3. Really understand that a balanced view of aging can help you change your attitude in a way that can make a difference in the long-term quality of your life.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...fifty&ir=Fifty
    somenurse, Davey Do, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

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    My personal goal is to avoid the cerebral stenosis and calcification of ideas that prevents consideration of new thoughts and ways of doing things. I'm not saying folks have to accept new ideas, just they should be able to give them an honest consideration.
    herring_RN and Tweety like this.
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    This is so true. This is the way to stay current as well as "needed" and "wanted" in this world.

    So many people here at AN complain that as they age, they were pushed out of a job, career, etc.

    This article goes back to the way I feel: if you act "old" you will be perceived as "old." It is sad but in this day and age, you have to be able to relate to people of all ages and that usually means not complaining about aches/pains, not complaining in general of getting old, etc.
    SharonH, RN and herring_RN like this.
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    Quote from traumaRUs
    This is so true. This is the way to stay current as well as "needed" and "wanted" in this world.

    So many people here at AN complain that as they age, they were pushed out of a job, career, etc.

    This article goes back to the way I feel: if you act "old" you will be perceived as "old." It is sad but in this day and age, you have to be able to relate to people of all ages and that usually means not complaining about aches/pains, not complaining in general of getting old, etc.
    I totally agree. Some people act like once they hit 50 or 60 they are suppose to decline, that it's a time of failing health, no sex life, doctors visits and that's how it's supposed to be.

    On the other hand 50 year olds that act like 20 years olds is annoying. LOL
    SharonH, RN and herring_RN like this.
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    It can be dangerous to accept symptoms as just part of aging.
    I know a woman who works full time as a waitress at age 63 complaining about swollen feet and ankles. She quoted the Rolling Stones, "What a drag it is getting old."
    I told her she needed to see a doctor. She went to a local clinic that charges on a sliding scale. The NP found that she had suffered an MI at sometime in the past and was in CHF. She was referred to a cardiologist. Now she is getting medical care and is no longer SOB. The swelling is gone too.

    Best not to assume feeling bad is part of normal aging.

    I'm blessed with good health. Other than occasional migraines I feel good if I've had enough sleep.
    Last edit by herring_RN on Nov 12, '12 : Reason: typo
    VivaLasViejas, SharonH, RN, and Tweety like this.
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    Good point Herring.

    Tweety - I totally agree that a 50-something y/o acting like they are 20 is not a pretty sight - lol. However, as a 50-something who works with a tough inner city crowd, I do have to stay up on the slang of the 20 y/o!
    herring_RN and Tweety like this.
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    Quote from herring_RN
    It can be dangerous to accept symptoms as just part of aging.
    Thank you for pointing this out Herring. I'm a geriatric nurse and I love it because I get to speak with the elderly every day. There are normal changes of aging but that doesn't mean pain, memory loss and frailty are to be accepted without challenge. I frequently hear people and caregivers dismiss symptoms as aging when often times the patient can be treated and enjoy an improvement in their quality of life. At the same time, refusing to accept that you are getting older and must make changes to your lifestyle to accommodate those changes is just as dangerous. The folks I worry about the most are the ones who insist on "thinking young" by ignoring the changes that come with age- paradoxically they are the ones most likely to suffer injury or death.
    Spidey's mom, herring_RN, and Tweety like this.
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    Quote from traumaRUs
    Good point Herring.

    Tweety - I totally agree that a 50-something y/o acting like they are 20 is not a pretty sight - lol. However, as a 50-something who works with a tough inner city crowd, I do have to stay up on the slang of the 20 y/o!
    As long as you don't adopt the language of the touch inner city crowd
    herring_RN likes this.
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    LOVE THIS!! Attitude really is 90% of everything, it really is. imo.



    edit: ha, no idea why my post didn't quote the OP original post, but, there you are.


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