Props to God, ignore the nurses - page 3

by CloudySue

17,345 Views | 180 Comments

My sister recently went through a horrible systemic group A strep infection and was not expected to live. Very long story short, she defied long-shot odds and today is mostly better, except for tinnitus d/t ABTs and rheumatoid... Read More


  1. 6
    I could post an extensive list of what happens when you rely on prayer only, but that would only start something that I dont want to. It does irk me too that the people that really had a huge hand in helping save your life dont get the nod. Oh well. Such is the thankless profession sometimes.
    DizzyLizzyNurse, Pistachio, brian, and 3 others like this.
  2. 8
    We've all seen pts that all the right things were done for them yet they passed away---the drugs were given, the drips titrated, the treatments administered---but they slipped away into eternity. No, God wasn't physically in the room to see him pushing drugs or doing a treatment, but he was there in spite of your unbelief in the form of those dedicated doctors and nurses whether you or any of them realized it. It's a pity you can't see this.
    RNam, DLStango, JRP1120, RN, and 5 others like this.
  3. 5
    I think we all have to agree that willpower and hope often go a long way in someone pulling through or not in very difficult situations. For some, the power of prayer/religion/faith go a long way to keeping someone motivated and stronger.

    Personally, although it is nice when a patient or family member thanks me for good care, really, the only thanks I need is seeing my patient get up and go home in better health than when I started caring for him/her, or else having made their passing a little easier, more comfortable, less scary, etc. I didn't enter nursing for the thanks and applause I thought I would get. If people want to thank God or Buddha or Allah or whoever they want, I don't care. If this belief gave them the strength to pull through, then they can thank them all they want.

    Now when they thank the doctor who spent all of 5 minutes with them while I did everything else, that upsets me a bit more.
  4. 2
    Quote from CloudySue
    Oops, yes, now I'm doing the same thing by forgetting everyone else! If that room wasn't clean, who knows what else she would have picked up! Of course I should have taken this idea much further. However as a nurse I guess I sympathize with the lack of thanks to my "peeps" the most.
    I wasn't being snarky with my post! I hope you didn't take it that way. I was more elaborating on your post...that it's not really God that did anything, it's EVERY HUMAN that is present....I wasn't knocking what you said AT ALL! Please dont think I was!
    brian and CloudySue like this.
  5. 19
    Quote from olderthandirt51
    We've all seen pts that all the right things were done for them yet they passed away---the drugs were given, the drips titrated, the treatments administered---but they slipped away into eternity. No, God wasn't physically in the room to see him pushing drugs or doing a treatment, but he was there in spite of your unbelief in the form of those dedicated doctors and nurses whether you or any of them realized it. It's a pity you can't see this.
    It's not really a pity. I dont believe in him, so I don't see an imaginary man there. I do however, see the miracle of science and research. I do see people working tirelessly, whether it's because they believe a god called them to this service or they just feel that they are compassionate individuals who want to help man-kind. Dont pity us, or feel pity for those of us that dont believe, we are perfectly happy in our solid science.
    DizzyLizzyNurse, lorirn58, Luckyyou, and 16 others like this.
  6. 13
    Well, I tried to have an open mind when reading this post but I could not leave without saying my 2 cents. There are some of us who believe in God wholeheartedly from experiences in our lives. And I understand there are others who do not. But as nurses, we should not do it for recognition or praise. I nurse because I get to touch lives and I feel that there is a reason why certain people cross my path. We give to others unselfishly because this is the profession we chose. The dirty, unappreciated work is ours. Some days we do have nice pts/families that thank us and bring us snacks, but many times the ones we make a big difference for are the ones who come in with a heart of stone and before your shift is over you get a little smile or a snarky remark that makes you laugh. The one who looks for you but is always mean and hateful, the little old lady with no family and no memory, the dying pt in need of love. We tend to the sick and needy expecting nothing in return.
    Somedays I long for a thank you but I know I do my job to the best of my ability and praise is not my priority.
    It is great that your sister recovered, but don't discredit their point of view just because you don't BELIEVE.
    From a Green nurse still trying to save the world. I love what I do and I nurse for the joy and purpose it brings to my life, which is thank you enough. Not many people can say that. Pat yourself on the back and move on there is another patient in need of your wonderful care.

    Have a great day!!
    RNam, AnitaIveyRN, DLStango, and 10 others like this.
  7. 11
    Quote from Msleely212
    .... But as nurses, we should not do it for recognition or praise. ....
    Why not? We also do it for a paycheck; I don't see too many lining up to do it for free. My staff deserves recognition and praise (most of the time, anyway!)....why shouldn't they expect it?

    Being a nurse doesn't mean we must be martyrs or saints.... but I say if you do something well, you should expect it to be noted.
  8. 14
    If God is omnipotent and responsible for her recovery, then God is also responsible for allowing her illness.
    DizzyLizzyNurse, prinsessa, Pistachio, and 11 others like this.
  9. 4
    Thanks for supplying that link and this thread. Amazing story.

    As to the subject, it doesn't bother me that folks attribute cures to God. In the midst of the terror of an illness, people can say what is in their hearts and I'm not going to judge them. In classes on bereavement, we are taught that mourning is individual and unique, highly personal. So each person's response to the cure of illness is looked at the same way to me. Highly individualized.

    I work hospice per diem - it is pretty amazing how much the families and patients give back to the hospice team. Our community supports hospice - in fact we are having an auction this weekend called "Chair-ity" where members of the community restore old chairs and they are auctioned off while the audience enjoys luscious desserts. Usually in obits in leu of flowers, they ask for donations to go to hospice.

    Your sis seemed genuine in her response about God but you know her best. Would you feel comfortable showing her this thread and getting her take on it?

    Again, thanks for writing.
  10. 14
    It's always nice to give credit to the caregivers, but realistically it is implied. Everyone knows that if a patient was in the hospital the patient's care was overseen by quality nurses, doctors, aids, etc.

    Christians believe that God created everything and is orchestrating everything. Medical professionals treat a patient but it's ultimately God who determines if the patient lives or dies. That's why your family is giving God thanks.

    I was an agnostic until I was 29 and thought I was intellectually superior to Christians. I was so wrong. In my experience, Christianity is a real, loving, thinking faith in a real, loving, omnipotent God. We are still flawed people living in a flawed world, but there is a peace you can find only in God and nowhere else.
    RNam, AnitaIveyRN, gatoraims RN, and 11 others like this.


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