Posthumous conception. What do you think? - pg.3 | allnurses

Posthumous conception. What do you think? - page 3

Hi everyone! This is an ethics assignment that I found very interesting! I have come to really enjoy my ethics class. :) I am interested in what you all think of this case study: "Jack was in a... Read More

  1. Visit  Katie5 profile page
    2
    Quote from GM2RN
    , and it's selfish to deliberatley conceive a child as a single person.
    I am an advocate against single parent families where it can be avoided...premarital sex, etc.

    But I think it unbelievably selfish and incredible of you to believe that a single person should not have a chance at parenthood, especially as this is her husband we are talking about.
    NICU Kristen and SilentfadesRPA like this.
  2. Visit  BrookeeLou_RN profile page
    2
    I believe the wife has all the rights and it is no one else's business. I agree with the poster who said she could freeze sperm and wait a yr.. that would give her time to avoid the knee-jerk reaction. It was her husband and is her right.
    ChristaRN and NICU Kristen like this.
  3. Visit  BCgradnurse profile page
    2
    I think this decision rests with the wife and nobody else. I know plenty of single parent families where the the child is loved, cherished, and their needs are met. There are all different types of families, not just the conventional husband and wife. We're all entitled to our opinions, but no one has the right to deny this woman her late husband's child.
    NICU Kristen and lifelearningrn like this.
  4. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from Katie5
    I am an advocate against single parent families where it can be avoided...premarital sex, etc.

    But I think it unbelievably selfish and incredible of you to believe that a single person should not have a chance at parenthood, especially as this is her husband we are talking about.

    Do you even realize what you just wrote? "...that a single person should not have a chance at parenthood..." is a completely selfish point of view that completely ignores any needs of the child.
  5. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    1
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    I think this decision rests with the wife and nobody else. I know plenty of single parent families where the the child is loved, cherished, and their needs are met. There are all different types of families, not just the conventional husband and wife. We're all entitled to our opinions, but no one has the right to deny this woman her late husband's child.
    No one is arguing the legalities of the question.

    Even though there are "all different types of families" now, children still have the best chance in this world with two parents.
    NICU Kristen likes this.
  6. Visit  lifelearningrn profile page
    1
    I think this is really bizarre.. It kind of reminds me of an episode of Private Practice where there was a couple that was carrying a little girl who had a terminal defect and would not live for more than a few hours. Moms eggs were gone and she wanted to harvest the babies eggs before she died so she could have them fertilized by a donor and implanted so she could have a child that was part of 'her'. I realize this is a much different situation but where does the slope end?

    How old is this woman? I know it's hard for her to think about right now but there is a good chance she'll find love again and have another chance at motherhood (unless she's at the very end of her 'clock').. I think a rash decision at this point is dangerous. She's mourning. She's wanting to hold on to a piece of the man she loves. I get that.. but again that slope. What is the roles were reversed and the wife was on life support and the husband wanted to impregnate her and keep her alive long enough to have the baby? Again, a little different but another thing on a slippery slope.
    NICU Kristen likes this.
  7. Visit  42pines profile page
    1
    Very selfish of the parents!

    Plenty of women are impregnated with donor sperm, so it's not an ethical issue. She should go for it--a child needs only one loving parent, though two is best.

    Sad that the husband's parents simply don't take the attitude that they too can act as surrogate parents.

    In some states there may be legal issues--but I have no clue about that.
    NICU Kristen likes this.
  8. Visit  Jolie profile page
    3
    I respectfuly disagree that this is simply the wife's decision. In a marriage, having children is a decision to be made by both spouses. Unless the husband gave written permission to extract his sperm post-humously, I believe it is highly unethical and immoral to make him a parent after his death, obviously without his consent or participation.

    For the female posters here who believe it is OK, how would you feel if your eggs were extracted upon your death and used by your spouse to have a child you would never know, raise or influence, without your consent or ability to decline participation?
    canoehead, GM2RN, and NICU Kristen like this.
  9. Visit  Jolie profile page
    2
    Quote from 42pines

    Plenty of women are impregnated with donor sperm, so it's not an ethical issue.
    Again, I respectfully disagree that no ethical issue exists. Sperm donors give their consent to father children with whom they intend to have no relationship.

    I doubt that was the intent of this now deceased man.

    If the woman wants to be inpregnated with donor sperm, I would have no issue, as there would be full consent of the involved parties. But unless this man gave his consent for sperm extraction prior to his death, it is wrong to make him an unwitting and non-participatory father after his death.
    GM2RN and NICU Kristen like this.
  10. Visit  CompleteUnknown profile page
    1
    Quote from Jolie



    For the female posters here who believe it is OK, how would you feel if your eggs were extracted upon your death and used by your spouse to have a child you would never know, raise or influence, without your consent or ability to decline participation?

    Good point. This whole thing gets more and more complicated and difficult the more you think about it.
    NICU Kristen likes this.
  11. Visit  BCgradnurse profile page
    2
    Quote from Jolie
    I respectfuly disagree that this is simply the wife's decision. In a marriage, having children is a decision to be made by both spouses. Unless the husband gave written permission to extract his sperm post-humously, I believe it is highly unethical and immoral to make him a parent after his death, obviously without his consent or participation.

    For the female posters here who believe it is OK, how would you feel if your eggs were extracted upon your death and used by your spouse to have a child you would never know, raise or influence, without your consent or ability to decline participation?
    I think by virtue that they were trying to conceive, the husband gives his implicit consent for the semen extraction. To look at it another way, if the wife could give consent for organ donation, than she can give consent for this too. And if my husband wanted to extract my eggs after my death, so he could have a child that was part of me, I would be highly honored.
    NICU Kristen and leslie :-D like this.
  12. Visit  Jolie profile page
    2
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    I think by virtue that they were trying to conceive, the husband gives his implicit consent for the semen extraction. To look at it another way, if the wife could give consent for organ donation, than she can give consent for this too. And if my husband wanted to extract my eggs after my death, so he could have a child that was part of me, I would be highly honored.
    Not trying to be argumentative, but I find this fascinating.

    I disagree that trying to conceive a child in life is the same as allowing posthumous fertilization. If they were trying to conceive, the husband likely assumed that he would be around to raise the child. I realize that all kinds of horrible things can prevent that in real life, but the point is that he was attempting to create a life which he intended to raise, guide, love, protect, etc.

    I don't think it is safe to assume that he would feel the same way about a life he would not ever have a chance to know.

    I also disagree that you can equate sperm with the donation of an organ. Giving consent for a loved-one's organs to be donated allows a mass of tissue to continue functioning in the body of another human, extending that person's life.

    It is not the same as creating another human.
    canoehead and NICU Kristen like this.
  13. Visit  BCgradnurse profile page
    1
    But the person is dead.......how does having a child harm him in any way, shape, or form????
    NICU Kristen likes this.


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