I'm going to get her fired!

  1. 4
    So, I like Downton Abbey. In the first season, Matthew, the middle-class newly-found heir to the estate is very uncomfortable with having a butler. He won't let him help him dress, lay out his clothes, all these things a butler apparently did for the Master of the House. At one point, he is discussing letting the butler go with Lord Granthem and the Earl's response is something like, "You would deprive a man and his family of his living because you don't like him helping you dress?"

    I think about this statement a lot. Why is healthcare so quick to fire people over stuff?

    I see so many posts on these boards of people getting "written up", people wanting to report people to the DON or the BON, people wanting to get co-workers fired, or people living in fear that this will happen to them.

    Is this what we've become? One mistake and "Off with her head!!!??" I've never seen this so much as I do in healthcare.

    It makes me truly sad.

    Now if a person is truly a danger to patients, (consistently, not just a one time error), abusive to absence and leave policies, totally taking advantage of the system, then they should loose their jobs. But loosing a job over a med error?

    Nursing needs to take a serious look at how it operates. We are all human, we all make mistakes. Instead of expecting perfection from individuals, maybe we should build systems that allow for double checks and triple checks, so that errors can be caught or easily mitigated.
    canoehead, GHGoonette, Mulan, and 1 other like this.
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    Not sure what this is in reference too but will move to Breakroom....

    OP could you clarify what this is about?
    Davey Do likes this.
  4. 1
    It's about the fact that nurses are always being fired and written up. I've never seen such much punishment in regards to employment as I have in nursing. People want to get people fired or in trouble at the drop of a hat, with now consideration of the person.
    Mulan likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from mappers
    It's about the fact that nurses are always being fired and written up. I've never seen such much punishment in regards to employment as I have in nursing. People want to get people fired or in trouble at the drop of a hat, with now consideration of the person.
    I haven't experienced this at all.
  6. 8
    I agree that I read quite commonly on AN about someone "should be reported to BON" or that an individual was fired or reprimanded for what they see as minor issues. I have no idea what reality is for them or any of you who are still working. Only you know these things.

    I no longer work as a nurse. I saw some pretty terrible things as a nurse. The nurse who misplaced a Levine tube into the lungs and then misread the MD order to flush with 30 ml saline. Instead she flushed 300cc down there. Fortunately it was change of shift and she did it just as I walked in. I never would have considered going to the BON. Discussion with her, yes. Immediate confrontation done with respect, yes.

    The nurse who gave blood to the wrong patient and we had a wild shift because of this. The ER nurse who gave 1/2 grain Morphine rather than Codeine because she misheard a verbal order. This for a 2 year old with burns.

    These were all bad mistakes. They were done by nurses. Not bad nurses. Not superior nurses, but nurses. They all acknowledged their mistakes and learned from them. Their mistakes helped me to not make some mistakes I might have made had I not seen these things.

    I see this rush to judgment by many. I have been guilty of it. As I have gotten older I look at karma. What goes around comes around. Those who spend time trying to find fault about others certainly are missing a few faults of their own.

    Tolerence is easier after you realize someone tolerated your less than stellar response to something.

    I do hope nurses go back to discussions with each other rather than continuing this rush to judgment. I think the entire work environment would be more pleasant.
  7. 1
    I think part of it is the growing trend of not having face to face conversations with people....texting has replaced even a phone call where you can hear the inflection in the caller's voice. Texting takes all the social interaction out of the communication in my opinion. Thus, when an incident such as those described by aky occur, and a good heart to heart, face to face conversation would have taken care of things in the past, it is not so these days, because young people, especially, have not learned how to have face to face interactions. Much of what they do is done by typing little letters onto little screens, sometimes while the person getting the text is in the same room.

    I find it sad on a personal level, because there is nothing I hate more than a series of texts, "discussing" something that could have been taken care of with a 2 minute phone call. (Plus I believe it shows more respect, but that is just me.) But on a professional level, it becomes something else, and it appears that the only way to resolve it is to report to the BON.
    herring_RN likes this.
  8. 4
    My impression was it may have been in response to a topic that has been closed. I agree that there have been many threads/posts regarding errors; staff who see their co-worker scratching too much, therefore he/she must have a drug problem...you name it, the way to handle it is call the BON. When I was a student, calling the BON was reserved for only the most grievous infractions, and you had better have your documentation nailed down tight. Reading some of these posts/threads, I don't get the sense that some people feel the enormity of making an accusation to the "Board."
    herring_RN, Rose_Queen, aknottedyarn, and 1 other like this.
  9. 0
    Could it just be that your experience is primarily in healthcare, hence that is where you are witnessing most of this behavior? I work in sponsored research for a university and see this sort of behavior just as much there as I ever did in direct healthcare. I know plenty of it goes in other industries from the stories I hear from friends and family.
  10. 2
    Quote from OCNRN63
    My impression was it may have been in response to a topic that has been closed. I agree that there have been many threads/posts regarding errors; staff who see their co-worker scratching too much, therefore he/she must have a drug problem...you name it, the way to handle it is call the BON. When I was a student, calling the BON was reserved for only the most grievous infractions, and you had better have your documentation nailed down tight. Reading some of these posts/threads, I don't get the sense that some people feel the enormity of making an accusation to the "Board."
    I'd venture to guess that a lot of folks I'm reading don't "get" the enormity of making an accusation to the BON unless someone makes one against THEM.
    herring_RN and OCNRN63 like this.
  11. 0
    I was fired after being accused of stealing narcs and altering documents at a nursing home in 2007 by a new grad/new hire LPN. Some of the alleged crimes took place on my days off! Her best friend was a new grad BSN just hired as the new manager of that particular rehab unit- Barbie doll type with Valley girl speech. I saw my accuser in the paper not long after- DUI and doing the same thing she accused me of! Gotta love me some karma... Just happy (yet curious why) I was never reported to the BON over the accusations.


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