Hunger Games... It is just me who thinks it's wrong? - page 4

by CloudySue 4,602 Views | 41 Comments

Whenever I get into a conversation about the HG books, whether in real life or online, I am baffled that no one seems to have had the same reaction as I did. I did not find the books "awesome" and "great" but absolutely appalling... Read More


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    Thanks - I do hospice as well.

    I left the hustle and bustle of a small rural hospital where I worked 12's from 0245 to 1515 and did OB, ER and all the rest.

    Right now I have still have a 10 year old at home and I just want to be available to him.

    You go with what works for your family - not my dream job but I like the kids. It's interesting to see the perspective from the other side of the fence now though. As a school employee - not just a mom.
    tewdles likes this.
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    I read the books and saw the movie. I liked the books much better. It went into more of the history of what happened to society, the mom and Katnisses' relationship with Peter and Gale.
    The entire premise behind the books is very disturbing. My teens thought the books were boring (they prefer Sci Fi). I was wondering how they were going to get a PG rating with all the gore.
    tewdles likes this.
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    Maybe the author's intention was to make it that horrific to get an emotional response from the reader (you). I think there's a powerful message when it comes to government, love, and the things humans are willing to do to survive.

    Granted, the book may not be suitable for children who do not have the capacity to see this underlying theme and message, but I suppose that is where parents need to come in and make that judgement call themselves.

    I think it's great that you were so emotionally distraught that you felt you needed to post something about it. Otherwise, this discussion would never have happened and these thoughts perhaps never formed.
    tewdles likes this.
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    I suppose I was brought up differently.

    My family lost many members in the Holocaust. I grew up in an area, well known for the Klan, and other "Christian" Identity/white supremacy groups. I had classmates whose parents were very outspoken racists, and Holocaust deniers

    Add in that mix, having a father that was frequently deployed for long periods of time during my childhood, and served in Vietnam. And when he returned, people used the "baby killer" phrase around me, and I was merely a child. Men (fathers of friends) often NEVER returned, their bodies lost and never found. It they came back, seriously disturbed.

    There is NOTHING in the Hunger Games that can compare to what my own childhood memories conjure up with what I knew of my family. When you arefour -five - six and you find that REAL people that you go to school with, are being taught to desire you wiped off the face of the earth for your religion. That parents can be taken from their children and never come back, not even a body to bury.

    I don't think most children, or teens really know the dangers of war or racism and tend to blow off these things. And that there is a grave danger in them not knowing the serious repercussions of these issues. We have a war going on, and yet people worry about an elevation in gas prices. Few have any real clue of war in their backyard and what happens when we forget the past. In other times, there would have been war rationing, and sacrifice made by all Americans.

    I can understand wanting to let children being children, but also think that we need to instill some idea of the possible privations that certain actions create, that there are moral stands to be taken in certain circumstances. And I think that many of the other teen films are quite amoral and display much worse examples of behavior.

    Many of the entitlement issues that we see (and often complain of on this BB), I think come from us not exposing them to a few of the realities out there. For exmple, both dominant players in a situation may both be evil, and we need to make a new way apart from them.

    And as a note, the drug use in the books. Most of Katniss' use was to a greater extent done to her, without her consent. I do not think that the use was overly heavy given the injuries/time period described. And I did see substantial evidence in the book that habitual users were denigrated and looked down on, and the harm discussed of habitual use.

    I did have an issue with the decision made about the Hunger Games at the end. But think that the final act of Katniss may have cancelled that decision from coming to fruition as there is no further mention of it (trying not to spoil the plot)

    Again, not a film for little kids, and not one that shouldn't have a certain amount of conversation about.
    anotherone, ShantheRN, tewdles, and 1 other like this.
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    well said caroladybelle
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    Okay, I just finished the trilogy and thought I would revisit this thread. I just noticed the OP mentioned never wanting her young children to know about this series. 6 and 9, right? I missed that part during my original read of this thread, and now I can say I fully agree with you in that regard. I would't recommend any true war stories for that age group either. Good grief.

    I remember the first piece of literature that truly terrified me as a child. It was 3rd or 4th grade and I was doing a report on civil rights. My mom came with me to the library to pick out books. One of them had a caricature of Jim Crow that was published in the newspaper. I don't even remember it clearly. Just a thin black man with barbed wire wrapped around him and a crown of thorns. It scared the bejesus out of me. I refused to even open that book anymore; in fact, my mom took it back to the library that day. I have no idea why. Point of the story is...had I seen that exact same image at 14, I would've understood what it meant and not been afraid. Your mind has to be mature enough to understand things. I was reading Stephen King in junior high. At the same time, we read Night. Which do you think gave me more nightmares?

    I can appreciate the feelings and discussions this trilogy would stir in a teen. The "humans are their own worst enemy" theme is a powerful one. And it should be. I wish they would just make the rest rated R so the story doesn't get watered down so much. I know it's a money thing so the intended audience can see the movie but....they are going to have to make some serious changes to the last book to keep it PG-13. I have a feeling a certain scene will be cut from it completely.

    But yeah.....anyone with a weak stomach or sensitivity to violence should steer clear The general public should know enough about this series now to avoid it if need be.
    Purple_Scrubs likes this.
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    All dystopias are disturbing, and I think it would be an abnormal person who did not find them so. I found 1984 and Brave New World to be very depressing books, probably because I prefer optimism to the alternative. On the other hand, I thoroughly enjoyed Genesis of Shannara, which deals with a post-apocalyptic world, but which is well-combined with fantasy, nobility and hope. From your descriptions I do not think I'll be reading any of these books, as they appear to embrace a concept of "abandon hope, all ye who enter these pages"!

    However, it can hardly be surprising that concepts of nobility and hope are being discarded by more and more authors. In a world where abuse of the weakest in society has become the norm, we can only pray that humanity eventually evolves into something better, instead of giving up the struggle for civilization and regressing to its bestial past.

    http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct...hgcgvnfxWW8bNQ
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    I saw nothing in the books to "abandon all hope". I did see characters that overcome major obstacles, that sacrificed for a laudable cause, that regretted making very human mistakes, and worked to better their world.As far as IRL, people abandoning nobility and hope, I have to wonder about your definition. I see plenty of hope out there. If you look at nobility as working for laudable goals, behaving with chivalry, etc. I see more of that today than in ancient times. If by nobility, you mean raising a chosen few up above all others, instilling power and authority, for no true merit and idolizing them, yes, I see that in spades but do not consider a good thing.
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    Quote from GHGoonette
    All dystopias are disturbing, and I think it would be an abnormal person who did not find them so. I found 1984 and Brave New World to be very depressing books, probably because I prefer optimism to the alternative. On the other hand, I thoroughly enjoyed Genesis of Shannara, which deals with a post-apocalyptic world, but which is well-combined with fantasy, nobility and hope. From your descriptions I do not think I'll be reading any of these books, as they appear to embrace a concept of "abandon hope, all ye who enter these pages"!

    However, it can hardly be surprising that concepts of nobility and hope are being discarded by more and more authors. In a world where abuse of the weakest in society has become the norm, we can only pray that humanity eventually evolves into something better, instead of giving up the struggle for civilization and regressing to its bestial past.

    http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct...hgcgvnfxWW8bNQ
    Sorry, seemed easier to quote myself and emphasise the "contentious" points. If I misunderstood the general opinions, my apologies. The books do sound to me to be dystopian in the extreme, and I did mention in the first line that I find them depressing. Heck, Animal Farm was damn depressing! The books I mentioned, which commence with Armageddon's Children, is a fantasy series which, to me, celebrate the triumph of the good over the evil which lurks within us, and the overcoming of our weaknesses. When I refer to "nobility", I would have thought it would be obvious that I was referring to "nobility of spirit", which has never belonged solely to the so-called aristocracy, and is certainly in scarce supply amongst the media's darlings.

    Furthermore, as I also underlined, such concepts are indeed being abandoned by more and more authors; how many simple moral tales of the triumph of good over evil are there today, outside of Bollywood, Harry Potter and Disney? I don't say they don't exist, merely that they don't sell like they used to. Thankfully, I was only referring to authors, not people.

    With regard to real life, I hope you checked out the link.
    Spidey's mom likes this.
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    I did not read these books, I will not read these books, nor see the movie. I have, however, seen some previews on the movie, and heard some conversation surrounding the books. I too, consider myself open minded when it comes to most things, but I just can't stomach kids enacting continual violence to survive, with no end in sight, the bombing of toddlers and the like. This is some sick stuff, and it revolves around children. It amazes me that people think these books are "awesome", but apparently. I am in the minority. We certianly live in a violent world, which can seem unfair to kids (and some adults!) but to glorify it, and somehow make the "winner" some sort of "supreme survivor" and heroine is not something that I would find entertaining or engrossing. I am not sure that any of us would like to see our kids in the mindset of bullying or enacting violence towards others as a "means to an end" so why in the world would we want out kids to read about exactly how violence seemingly solves everything? In all fairness, I have not read or seen the movie of this series--but this is the impression I am getting just from previews and conversations. Further, in the times of "Lord of the Flies" the entire premise seemed so far fetched (as in the likes of Cantenbury Tales and Alice in Wonderland and other fairy tales) that it was unreal to think this stuff could actually happen (and quite frankly, to try it would be to face the consequences--a little known fact that many kids today don't see as a real threat, to be honest). It was a different world. When you can't even turn on the evening news without hearing horrific news every day of violence and mayhem, the last thing I want to relax to is more of the same.
    Purple_Scrubs likes this.


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