Hunger Games... It is just me who thinks it's wrong? - page 3

Whenever I get into a conversation about the HG books, whether in real life or online, I am baffled that no one seems to have had the same reaction as I did. I did not find the books "awesome" and... Read More

  1. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    1
    Quote from Purple_Scrubs
    I didn't read the books, actually did not hear much about them until the promos for the film started coming out. I am with the minority...I had a distinctly unpleasant visceral reaction when I learned of the premise of the story. I will admit to a little morbid curiosity, like the car wreck analogy, but I'm still not sure if I will take the bait or not. I can say for sure no child of mine will be reading or watching it. I'm a foster parent, bearing witness to horrific violence against children is a part of my everyday life. I do not see it as entertainment or anything other than disturbing and distressing.

    For the record, I was also very uncomfortable with Lord of the Flies, which I was required to read in High School. Certain images from the book have stayed with me to this day. Maybe I just don't have the constitution for that stuff.
    I had the same uncomfortable feeling. But I read Ray Bradbury and lots of science fiction as a kid. Loved Stephen King as an adult but stopped reading him when I was preggers with my first child. It was just too much. Anyone remember pregnancy dreams!? I didn't need to add any more fodder for those nightmarish things!

    I'm not curious about the books enough to read them. I have a long list of books I really want to read.

    And as an ER nurse, I too have seen some pretty horrific things done to kids and wouldn't want to revisit that in a book. Kudos to you for being a foster parent.
    Purple_Scrubs likes this.
  2. Visit  tewdles profile page
    3
    I recently read the first book on a VERY long flight. It was a good read, especially in that situation, IMHO. Yes the violence perpetrated on children and the premise that it was required for the "entertainment" of the elite was horrific, but it is that genre. I also thought that the "Halloween" movie where the kids put on masks and creepy crawlies came out of their heads was pretty horrific...I was introduced to that by my son when he was a teenager. Ugh. I never read the book "The Shack" because it started with the murder of a child. It didn't matter to me what came next, I just didn't want any of that first part in my head. There was a young girl (7 or 8 y.o.) murdered in my community recently. When they found her body next to the river it was determined that she was brutalized, tortured, and suffered prior to her death. She had been buried in a shallow grave before she was dead. Her killer has never been discovered. To me, that is the stuff that I do not want children to read or hear about. That is NOT fiction.

    The books were clearly NOT written for young children. What is the rating of the movie? I would have to guess at least pg-13 for the violence, but I have not seen it, and probably won't.

    I did not read EVERY book that my teens read and would admire someone who did, that takes time and commitment. But I often had conversations with the librarian if I was concerned. I did not read the HP series, and when my church was all up in arms about kids reading about magic, etc. I maintained a level head and did not prevent my daughter from enjoying the series. She never did and still does not practice any of the "black arts". LOL I read the Dan Brown books even though many Christians believe that they are heretical and dangerous to the faithful...mostly I think they are fiction and fun to read.

    There are genres of literature, music, film, and other arts that will offend some and delight others. For instance, I would be offended by a piece of art depicting urinating or similar on Jesus Christ. The simple answer to that (for me) is to be informed and to avoid supporting that type of art in any fashion. It would be incorrect of me to suggest that others not have access to it based on my beliefs or feelings. Some folks really enjoyed "The Passion of the Christ" others were offended. I remember when JC Superstar came out. My mom didn't want me to see it, hippies blaspheming the story of Christ. I once knew all of the words to the songs and it was influential in my acceptance of Christ. I don't read horror books/stories...they creep me out...but they should be in the library.

    I have been continually amazed at how dumb some parents are about children and what requires their attention and protection. I so deeply agree that we should, in the best ways we can, to allow our children to be children. There is soooo much pressure for them to grow up too early. We, all of us, forget how to play too soon.

    We can rate movies but some parent will inevitably take their young child to an inappropriate film. We can rate music but some parent will purchase inappropriate CDs for their child, and not bat an eye when their 8 year old sings all of the lyrics. We can create laws to protect children from pornography or sexual abuse but some parent will encourage inappropriate behavior and/or dress in their child, laugh at it, film it, and post it on You-tube. We can create laws and rules but we will never be able to legislate common sense, good parenting, or morality.

    I applaud the parent who is engaged in understanding what is being presented to their child and will defend their absolute right to say no to a book, or a course, or a curriculum in the public school as related to their child. I refused to allow my children to participate in the health course that dealt with sexuality. My kids were embarassed but I am glad that we provided our own views with the facts rather than the world's views with the facts. If you don't want you teens to read the Hunger series, more power to you, that is your right and you get to decide for your children.

    Forgive my long winded thoughts...
  3. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    1
    Quote from tewdles
    The books were clearly NOT written for young children. What is the rating of the movie? I would have to guess at least pg-13 for the violence, but I have not seen it, and probably won't.

    .
    I enjoyed reading your entire post! But wanted to highlight this as what you wrote is my problem. Parents letting young children read these books or watch the movie. This movie is playing in our local theatre - it is two doors down. As the local school district nurse, I'll be interested in seeing who allows their young kids to see the movie.

    I'll be talking it up at school . .. we'll see how that goes.
    tewdles likes this.
  4. Visit  tewdles profile page
    1
    I agree, Spidey's mom, the inexplicable behavior of some parents is very troubling for many of us. Heck, I was a PICU nurse for quite a number of years. I wish I could say that I never saw a child suffer or die because of the stupidity, neglect, or abuse of a parent, but I can't.

    Fortunately, as a school nurse you have a voice in that parenting community and may be able to influence the parenting behaviors of SOME of the family groups. Outside of that, you just get to observe the damage done to the children and how it affects their fragile and precious lives.

    good luck...yours is an important but under-paid and under-appreciated specialty
    Spidey's mom likes this.
  5. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    1
    Thanks - I do hospice as well.

    I left the hustle and bustle of a small rural hospital where I worked 12's from 0245 to 1515 and did OB, ER and all the rest.

    Right now I have still have a 10 year old at home and I just want to be available to him.

    You go with what works for your family - not my dream job but I like the kids. It's interesting to see the perspective from the other side of the fence now though. As a school employee - not just a mom.
    tewdles likes this.
  6. Visit  tokmom profile page
    1
    I read the books and saw the movie. I liked the books much better. It went into more of the history of what happened to society, the mom and Katnisses' relationship with Peter and Gale.
    The entire premise behind the books is very disturbing. My teens thought the books were boring (they prefer Sci Fi). I was wondering how they were going to get a PG rating with all the gore.
    tewdles likes this.
  7. Visit  eo11 profile page
    1
    Maybe the author's intention was to make it that horrific to get an emotional response from the reader (you). I think there's a powerful message when it comes to government, love, and the things humans are willing to do to survive.

    Granted, the book may not be suitable for children who do not have the capacity to see this underlying theme and message, but I suppose that is where parents need to come in and make that judgement call themselves.

    I think it's great that you were so emotionally distraught that you felt you needed to post something about it. Otherwise, this discussion would never have happened and these thoughts perhaps never formed.
    tewdles likes this.
  8. Visit  caroladybelle profile page
    4
    I suppose I was brought up differently.

    My family lost many members in the Holocaust. I grew up in an area, well known for the Klan, and other "Christian" Identity/white supremacy groups. I had classmates whose parents were very outspoken racists, and Holocaust deniers

    Add in that mix, having a father that was frequently deployed for long periods of time during my childhood, and served in Vietnam. And when he returned, people used the "baby killer" phrase around me, and I was merely a child. Men (fathers of friends) often NEVER returned, their bodies lost and never found. It they came back, seriously disturbed.

    There is NOTHING in the Hunger Games that can compare to what my own childhood memories conjure up with what I knew of my family. When you arefour -five - six and you find that REAL people that you go to school with, are being taught to desire you wiped off the face of the earth for your religion. That parents can be taken from their children and never come back, not even a body to bury.

    I don't think most children, or teens really know the dangers of war or racism and tend to blow off these things. And that there is a grave danger in them not knowing the serious repercussions of these issues. We have a war going on, and yet people worry about an elevation in gas prices. Few have any real clue of war in their backyard and what happens when we forget the past. In other times, there would have been war rationing, and sacrifice made by all Americans.

    I can understand wanting to let children being children, but also think that we need to instill some idea of the possible privations that certain actions create, that there are moral stands to be taken in certain circumstances. And I think that many of the other teen films are quite amoral and display much worse examples of behavior.

    Many of the entitlement issues that we see (and often complain of on this BB), I think come from us not exposing them to a few of the realities out there. For exmple, both dominant players in a situation may both be evil, and we need to make a new way apart from them.

    And as a note, the drug use in the books. Most of Katniss' use was to a greater extent done to her, without her consent. I do not think that the use was overly heavy given the injuries/time period described. And I did see substantial evidence in the book that habitual users were denigrated and looked down on, and the harm discussed of habitual use.

    I did have an issue with the decision made about the Hunger Games at the end. But think that the final act of Katniss may have cancelled that decision from coming to fruition as there is no further mention of it (trying not to spoil the plot)

    Again, not a film for little kids, and not one that shouldn't have a certain amount of conversation about.
    anotherone, ShantheRN, tewdles, and 1 other like this.
  9. Visit  tewdles profile page
    0
    well said caroladybelle
  10. Visit  ShantheRN profile page
    1
    Okay, I just finished the trilogy and thought I would revisit this thread. I just noticed the OP mentioned never wanting her young children to know about this series. 6 and 9, right? I missed that part during my original read of this thread, and now I can say I fully agree with you in that regard. I would't recommend any true war stories for that age group either. Good grief.

    I remember the first piece of literature that truly terrified me as a child. It was 3rd or 4th grade and I was doing a report on civil rights. My mom came with me to the library to pick out books. One of them had a caricature of Jim Crow that was published in the newspaper. I don't even remember it clearly. Just a thin black man with barbed wire wrapped around him and a crown of thorns. It scared the bejesus out of me. I refused to even open that book anymore; in fact, my mom took it back to the library that day. I have no idea why. Point of the story is...had I seen that exact same image at 14, I would've understood what it meant and not been afraid. Your mind has to be mature enough to understand things. I was reading Stephen King in junior high. At the same time, we read Night. Which do you think gave me more nightmares?

    I can appreciate the feelings and discussions this trilogy would stir in a teen. The "humans are their own worst enemy" theme is a powerful one. And it should be. I wish they would just make the rest rated R so the story doesn't get watered down so much. I know it's a money thing so the intended audience can see the movie but....they are going to have to make some serious changes to the last book to keep it PG-13. I have a feeling a certain scene will be cut from it completely.

    But yeah.....anyone with a weak stomach or sensitivity to violence should steer clear The general public should know enough about this series now to avoid it if need be.
    Purple_Scrubs likes this.
  11. Visit  GHGoonette profile page
    0
    All dystopias are disturbing, and I think it would be an abnormal person who did not find them so. I found 1984 and Brave New World to be very depressing books, probably because I prefer optimism to the alternative. On the other hand, I thoroughly enjoyed Genesis of Shannara, which deals with a post-apocalyptic world, but which is well-combined with fantasy, nobility and hope. From your descriptions I do not think I'll be reading any of these books, as they appear to embrace a concept of "abandon hope, all ye who enter these pages"!

    However, it can hardly be surprising that concepts of nobility and hope are being discarded by more and more authors. In a world where abuse of the weakest in society has become the norm, we can only pray that humanity eventually evolves into something better, instead of giving up the struggle for civilization and regressing to its bestial past.

    http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct...hgcgvnfxWW8bNQ
  12. Visit  caroladybelle profile page
    0
    I saw nothing in the books to "abandon all hope". I did see characters that overcome major obstacles, that sacrificed for a laudable cause, that regretted making very human mistakes, and worked to better their world.As far as IRL, people abandoning nobility and hope, I have to wonder about your definition. I see plenty of hope out there. If you look at nobility as working for laudable goals, behaving with chivalry, etc. I see more of that today than in ancient times. If by nobility, you mean raising a chosen few up above all others, instilling power and authority, for no true merit and idolizing them, yes, I see that in spades but do not consider a good thing.
  13. Visit  GHGoonette profile page
    1
    Quote from GHGoonette
    All dystopias are disturbing, and I think it would be an abnormal person who did not find them so. I found 1984 and Brave New World to be very depressing books, probably because I prefer optimism to the alternative. On the other hand, I thoroughly enjoyed Genesis of Shannara, which deals with a post-apocalyptic world, but which is well-combined with fantasy, nobility and hope. From your descriptions I do not think I'll be reading any of these books, as they appear to embrace a concept of "abandon hope, all ye who enter these pages"!

    However, it can hardly be surprising that concepts of nobility and hope are being discarded by more and more authors. In a world where abuse of the weakest in society has become the norm, we can only pray that humanity eventually evolves into something better, instead of giving up the struggle for civilization and regressing to its bestial past.

    http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct...hgcgvnfxWW8bNQ
    Sorry, seemed easier to quote myself and emphasise the "contentious" points. If I misunderstood the general opinions, my apologies. The books do sound to me to be dystopian in the extreme, and I did mention in the first line that I find them depressing. Heck, Animal Farm was damn depressing! The books I mentioned, which commence with Armageddon's Children, is a fantasy series which, to me, celebrate the triumph of the good over the evil which lurks within us, and the overcoming of our weaknesses. When I refer to "nobility", I would have thought it would be obvious that I was referring to "nobility of spirit", which has never belonged solely to the so-called aristocracy, and is certainly in scarce supply amongst the media's darlings.

    Furthermore, as I also underlined, such concepts are indeed being abandoned by more and more authors; how many simple moral tales of the triumph of good over evil are there today, outside of Bollywood, Harry Potter and Disney? I don't say they don't exist, merely that they don't sell like they used to. Thankfully, I was only referring to authors, not people.

    With regard to real life, I hope you checked out the link.
    Spidey's mom likes this.

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