Baby Boomers and Ageism

  1. It's happening. Do you think it's happening in nursing? I've often wondered at my age what would happen if I had to enter the job market. I'm not sure I can do floor nursing until I retire.
    Baby boomers are taking on ageism — and losing - The Washington Post
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Tweety - you bring up great points. I'm your age and probably will stay in my job til I retire and like you will go along til I'm 70 as long as I'm healthy.
  4. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from Tweety
    It's happening. Do you think it's happening in nursing? I've often wondered at my age what would happen if I had to enter the job market. I'm not sure I can do floor nursing until I retire.
    Baby boomers are taking on ageism — and losing - The Washington Post
    The happiest people I meet are nurses who have retired in their early 60's. Some have gone on and done some part time work in other industries, some do voluntary work and some look after grandchildren. But, to a (wo)man they tell me that retiring was the best thing they ever did and don't know how they found time to work they are so busy doing stuff they enjoy.

    I am planning on retiring next year - I will be 62 - and would be horrified at having to work into my 70's. I know I would be a danger to my patients and to myself.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from GrumpyRN
    The happiest people I meet are nurses who have retired in their early 60's.

    Some have gone on and done some part time work in other industries, some do voluntary work and some look after grandchildren
    .

    But, to a (wo)man they tell me that retiring was the best thing they ever did and don't know how they found time to work they are so busy doing stuff they enjoy.

    I am planning on retiring next year - I will be 62 - and would be horrified at having to work into my 70's. I know I would be a danger to my patients and to myself.
    I would like to be this person as well. But, we have a mortgage, I still have a student loan because I went back to get my BSN in my 50's, and my Kia is looking like it might need to be replaced so another freaking car payment might be in the offing as well as my husband's pickup payment. (I'm hoping the mechanic can fix the problem on my car though).
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from GrumpyRN
    The happiest people I meet are nurses who have retired in their early 60's. Some have gone on and done some part time work in other industries, some do voluntary work and some look after grandchildren. But, to a (wo)man they tell me that retiring was the best thing they ever did and don't know how they found time to work they are so busy doing stuff they enjoy.

    I am planning on retiring next year - I will be 62 - and would be horrified at having to work into my 70's. I know I would be a danger to my patients and to myself.
    My best friend was able to retire at age 62. He was in the state university system of Texas and gets a pension, unlike me whose responsible for myself. He's quite happy.

    Good luck and I hope in retirement you rejuvenate so you aren't a danger to anyone. LOL

    I picked age 70 to retire as a financial decision. I just won't be ready at age 62 or 65 I don't think. But time will tell.

    In the meantime, I'm trying to balance life and spending. I'm probably sacrificing some retirement, but I'm also not putting things off. I decided to travel while I'm young and vibrant (age 57) and not wait. This year I went to Southeast Asia and am planning my next travels soon.

    If I lived frugally, didn't travel, didn't go out to eat, didn't go to the movies and stashed away every penny I could retire earlier, but I'm not willing to live like that. I might regret it, but I might have a stroke next year and be happy I've done the things I've done while I could.
  7. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Thank goodness I have my private-duty cases. I do have to work, and retirement is but a pipe dream at this point.
    At least I can choose which cases I will work and don't have to take on physically challenging work. I used to be the one who frequently, voluntarily took on the 'hard/difficult' patients/cases. So, what I am doing now...well, I call it my "Ain't Hardly Work" jobs.
    I reckon it's about as close to retirement as I'll get, so I figure I owe it to myself to be in a position to ENJOY the work I do.
  8. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from Tweety
    My best friend was able to retire at age 62. He was in the state university system of Texas and gets a pension, unlike me whose responsible for myself. He's quite happy.
    Yes, like your friend I get a pension, have paid into it since I started nursing and is not controlled (too much) by government. Plus, will get state pension when I reach 66 - I have paid into this since I was 15.

    Quote from Tweety
    Good luck and I hope in retirement you rejuvenate so you aren't a danger to anyone. LOL
    More likely be a danger to myself. I want to be the one that people look at and say "what is he up to now."

    Quote from Tweety
    I picked age 70 to retire as a financial decision. I just won't be ready at age 62 or 65 I don't think. But time will tell.
    Yes, sadly a lot of people have been scr**ed financially over the past few years.


    Quote from Tweety
    If I lived frugally, didn't travel, didn't go out to eat, didn't go to the movies and stashed away every penny I could retire earlier, but I'm not willing to live like that.
    No way to live. Enjoy yourself.
  9. by   Grace Oz
    Read the article and for some obscure and unknown reason; Mother Theresa ... Nelson Mandela ..... Fred Hollows .... and other inspiring older (past "retirement" age) individuals , when they were still alive and working so hard (mostly voluntary)...no-one complained about those wonderful older citizens!!

    Seems that so long as us Baby Boomers aren't "stealing" the jobs of the younger generation, we're acceptable.
    It's OK for us to give our time and selves as volunteers...but don't dare any of us hold a paid position!!

    I come from a town here in Oz, whereby once a woman married, she had to resign her position!!!!
    No married women were permitted to work!!
    Yes, it was a Union run city in the outback!!!
    Sure, no young women were without employment ... but you had a town full of unfulfilled, depressed, bored witless married women!!
    Thankfully, with progress, that has now changed!!!

    I think the world has and is changing at such a rate, what once worked, no longer does.
    Government pension schemes were once an "entitlement" many many people relied on in retirement.
    However, that was in a different time and with different expectations of retirement living.
    In Australia; private superannuation schemes were once only the domain of the Military, the governments (both federal and state) bankers, legal professions, wealthy business folks, other companies etc.... the everyday person either never knew about superannuation, couldn't afford to fund it, only their employer contributed to a fund on their behalf ... etc etc.
    It wasn't until the 1980's as I recall, that "ordinary" /everyday citizens were strongly encouraged to join a superannuation fund / scheme.
    That's when it began to become very evident that there was not going to be enough money in the governments kitty to fund age pensions.
    There was a scramble for folks to join funds / schemes and begin their own contributions.
    However, for many it is a case of: too late. There would never be enough accumulated to finance a comfortable retirement.
    I don't know too many Aussies who are not having their retirement funds topped up by a government pension as well.
  10. by   azhiker96
    Current new and improved plan is to work full time until 70 to maximize both Social security and pension. Then I'll just pick up some PRN shifts to have a little walking around money. My DW may retire early or more likely when she turns 66y6m. That means she'll have a few years of play time while I finish my full time work. She'll probably invest time in gardening and grandkids while I toil away.
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from azhiker96
    Current new and improved plan is to work full time until 70 to maximize both Social security and pension. Then I'll just pick up some PRN shifts to have a little walking around money. My DW may retire early or more likely when she turns 66y6m. That means she'll have a few years of play time while I finish my full time work. She'll probably invest time in gardening and grandkids while I toil away.
    This sounds like a plan for me. Dh will probably work driving tractors for a local farming family until the day he dies.

    But, I want freedom from working so much and missing out on my grandkids.
  12. by   GrumpyRN
    Further to this thread, my notice went in a few months ago and I retire in 5 weeks.

    Just a little apprehensive but looking forward to it.

    I have prepared by living on the same amount of money my pension will be for the past few months - it is definitely liveable.

    Now, have to find something to pass the time that I will enjoy.
  13. by   elkpark
    Quote from GrumpyRN
    Further to this thread, my notice went in a few months ago and I retire in 5 weeks.

    Just a little apprehensive but looking forward to it.

    I have prepared by living on the same amount of money my pension will be for the past few months - it is definitely liveable.

    Now, have to find something to pass the time that I will enjoy.
    Congrats! I'm envious ...
  14. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    YAAAAY, Grumpacious One!

    I've had 2 weeks off while helping husband transition into the diabetic life, and...now I don't want to go back to work​. *SIGH*

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